Quotations by Author

Homer (800 BC - 700 BC)
Greek epic poet [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Homer online at The Literature Page
The fates have given mankind a patient soul.
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Homer, The Iliad
The glorious gifts of the gods are not to be cast aside.
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Homer, The Iliad
The outcome of the war is in our hands; the outcome of words is in the council.
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Homer, The Iliad
The single best augury is to fight for one's country.
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Homer, The Iliad
There is a fullness of all things, even of sleep and love.
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Homer, The Iliad
There is a strength in the union even of very sorry men.
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Homer, The Iliad
Thus have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals: that they live in grief while they themselves are without cares; for two jars stand on the floor of Zeus of the gifts which he gives, one of evils and another of blessings.
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Homer, The Iliad
Whoever obeys the gods, to him they particularly listen.
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Homer, The Iliad
You will certainly not be able to take the lead in all things yourself, for to one man a god has given deeds of war, and to another the dance, to another lyre and song, and in another wide-sounding Zeus puts a good mind.
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Homer, The Iliad
Young men's minds are always changeable, but when an old man is concerned in a matter, he looks both before and after.
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Homer, The Iliad
Zeus does not bring all men's plans to fulfillment.
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Homer, The Iliad
A small rock holds back a great wave.
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Homer, The Odyssey
A young man is embarrassed to question an older one.
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Homer, The Odyssey
All men have need of the gods.
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Homer, The Odyssey
All strangers and beggars are from Zeus, and a gift, though small, is precious.
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Homer, The Odyssey
Among all men on the earth bards have a share of honor and reverence, because the muse has taught them songs and loves the race of bards.
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Homer, The Odyssey
By their own follies they perished, the fools.
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Homer, The Odyssey
Dreams surely are difficult, confusing, and not everything in them is brought to pass for mankind. For fleeting dreams have two gates: one is fashioned of horn and one of ivory. Those which pass through the one of sawn ivory are deceptive, bringing tidings which come to nought, but those which issue from the one of polished horn bring true results when a mortal sees them.
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Homer, The Odyssey
Even his griefs are a joy long after to one that remembers all that he wrought and endured.
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Homer, The Odyssey
Evil deeds do not prosper; the slow man catches up with the swift.
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Homer, The Odyssey
Showing quotations 21 to 40 of 56 total.
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