Quotations by Subject

Quotations by Subject: Marriage
(Related Subjects: Love, Sex, Children)
Showing quotations 31 to 60 of 61 quotations in our collections
We were happily married for eight months. Unfortunately, we were married for four and a half years.
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Nick Faldo
If you would marry suitably, marry your equal.
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Ovid (43 BC - 17 AD)
That is what marriage really means: helping one another to reach the full status of being persons, responsible and autonomous beings who do not run away from life.
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Paul Tournier
A good marriage is one which allows for change and growth in the individuals and in the way they express their love.
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Pearl Buck (1892 - 1973)
You get married at twenty, you're going to be shocked who you're living with at thirty.
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Peter Blake, House M.D., Fools For Love, 2006
That's the thing about marriage. It's a shell game we play with ourselves. We're the suckers and we have to lose, but we play anyway because we lie to ourselves that we can win.
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Randy K. Milholland, Something Positive, Family's A Gamble Part 5, 07-25-13
I love being married. It's so great to find that one special person you want to annoy for the rest of your life.
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Rita Rudner
In Hollywood a marriage is a success if it outlasts milk.
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Rita Rudner
When I meet a man I ask myself, 'Is this the man I want my children to spend their weekends with?'
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Rita Rudner
Happiness just wasn't part of the job description back then. You tried to find a helpmate to keep the cold wind and dogs at bay. Happiness just wasn't part of the equation. Survival was.
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Robin Green, Northern Exposure, Burning Down the House, 1992
Such is the common process of marriage. A youth and maiden exchange meeting by chance, or brought together by artifice, exchange glances, reciprocate civilities, go home, and dream of one another. Having little to divert attention, or diversify thought, they find themselves uneasy when they are apart, and therefore conclude that they shall be happy together. They marry, and discover what nothing but voluntary blindness had before concealed; they wear out life in altercations, and charge nature with cruelty.
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Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784), Rasselas
There is no observation more frequently made by such as employ themselves in surveying the conduct of mankind, than that marriage, though the dictate of nature, and the institution of Providence, is yet very often the cause of misery, and that those who enter into that state can seldom forbear to express their repentance, and their envy of those whom either chance or caution hath withheld from it.
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Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784), Rambler #18
Remember, that if thou marry for beauty, thou bindest thyself all thy life for that which perchance will neither last nor please thee one year; and when thou hast it, it will be to thee of no price at all; for the desire dieth when it is attained, and the affection perisheth when it is satisfied.
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Sir Walter Raleigh (1552 - 1618)
By all means marry; if you get a good wife, you'll be happy. If you get a bad one, you'll become a philosopher.
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Socrates (469 BC - 399 BC)
Dude, marriage is the 'get out of loneliness free' card in the Monopoly game of life.
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Veronica Pare and Ferrett Steinmetz, Home on the Strange, 11-09-07
Marriage is the only adventure open to the cowardly.
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Voltaire (1694 - 1778)
American women expect to find in their husbands a perfection that English women only hope to find in their butlers.
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W. Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965), The Razor's Edge, 1943
I'm not a real movie star. I've still got the same wife I started out with twenty-eight years ago.
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Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)
Never marry but for love; but see that thou lovest what is lovely.
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William Penn (1644 - 1718)
By this marriage, all little jealousies, which now seem great , and all great fears, which now import their dangers would then be nothing.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, sc. 2
I have wedded her, not bedded her; and sworn to make the 'not' eternal.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), All's Well that Ends Well, Act III, sc. 2
I will fasten on this sleeve of thine: thou art an elm, my husband, I a vine.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Comedy of Errors, Act II, sc. 2
If there be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are married and have more occasion to know one another...upon familiarity will grow more contempt.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act I, sc. 1
Men are April when they woo, December when they wed: maids are may when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), As You Like It, Act IV, sc. 1
O curse of marriage, that we can call these delicate creatures ours, and not their appetites.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Othello, Act III, sc. 3
The ancient saying is no heresy, hanging and wiving goes by destiny.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Merchant of Venice, Act II, sc. 9
Though I want a kingdom, yet in marriage I may not prove inferior to yourself.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Henry VI, Part III, Act IV, sc. 1
[Marriage is] a world-without-end bargain.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Love's Labour's Lost
I tended to place my wife under a pedestal.
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Woody Allen (1935 - )
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Showing quotations 31 to 60 of 61 quotations in our collections
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