Quotations by Author

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)
26th president of US [more author details]
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No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expediency.
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Theodore Roosevelt, 'The Strenuous Life,' 1900
Justice consists not in being neutral between right and wrong, but in finding out the right and upholding it, wherever found, against the wrong.
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Theodore Roosevelt, 1916 (quoted in the Theodore Roosevelt Centennial CD-ROM)
We are face to face with our destiny and we must meet it with high and resolute courage. For us is the life of action, of strenuous performance of duty; let us live in the harness, striving mightily; let us rather run the risk of wearing out than rusting out.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Address at the opening of the gubernatorial campaign, New York City, October 5, 1898
The death-knell of the republic had rung as soon as the active power became lodged in the hands of those who sought, not to do justice to all citizens, rich and poor alike, but to stand for one special class and for its interests as opposed to the interests of others.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Labor Day speech at Syracuse, NY, Sept 7, 1903 ("Theodore Rex" - Edmund Morris)
The conservation of our natural resources and their proper use constitute the fundamental problem which underlies almost every other problem of our national life.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Message to Congress, December 3, 1907
The most practical kind of politics is the politics of decency.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Remarks to Harvard and Yale undergraduates invited to Sagamore Hill, Oyster Bay, Long Island, June 1901
The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, and not impaired, in value.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Speech before the Colorado Live Stock Association, Denver, Colorado, August 19, 1910
There is a homely old adage which runs: "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far." If the American nation will speak softly, and yet build and keep at a pitch of the highest training a thoroughly efficient navy, the Monroe Doctrine will go far.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Speech in Chicago, 3 Apr. 1903
Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Speech in New York, September 7, 1903
Let us speak courteously, deal fairly, and keep ourselves armed and ready.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Speech, San Francisco, May 13, 1903
No foreign policy-no matter how ingenious-has any chance of success if it is born in the minds of few and carried in the hearts of many.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Speech, San Francisco, May 13, 1903
We cannot afford merely to sit down and deplore the evils of city life as inevitable, when cities are constantly growing, both absolutely and relatively. We must set ourselves vigorously about the task of improving them; and this task is now well begun.
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Theodore Roosevelt, The City in Modern Life, 1926
Wars are, of course, as a rule to be avoided; but they are far better than certain kinds of peace.
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Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Hart Benton, Chapter 12, 1897

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Showing quotations 21 to 33 of 33 total.
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