Quotations by Author

Plato (427 BC - 347 BC)
Greek author & philosopher in Athens [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Plato online at The Literature Page
False words are not only evil in themselves, but they infect the soul with evil.
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Plato, Dialogues, Phaedo
Must not all things at the last be swallowed up in death?
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Plato, Dialogues, Phaedo
The partisan, when he is engaged in a dispute, cares nothing about the rights of the question, but is anxious only to convince his hearers of his own assertions.
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Plato, Dialogues, Phaedo
Friends have all things in common.
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Plato, Dialogues, Phaedrus
The greatest penalty of evildoing - namely, to grow into the likeness of bad men.
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Plato, Dialogues, Theatetus
You are young, my son, and, as the years go by, time will change and even reverse many of your present opinions. Refrain therefore awhile from setting yourself up as a judge of the highest matters.
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Plato, Dialogues, Theatetus
Any one who has common sense will remember that the bewilderments of the eyes are of two kinds, and arise from two causes, either from coming out of the light or from going into the light, which is true of the mind's eye, quite as much as of the bodily eye; and he who remembers this when he sees any one whose vision is perplexed and weak, will not be too ready to laugh; he will first ask whether that soul of man has come out of the brighter light, and is unable to see because unaccustomed to the dark, or having turned from darkness to the day is dazzled by excess of light.
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Plato, The Republic
Astronomy compels the soul to look upwards and leads us from this world to another.
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Plato, The Republic
Bodily exercise, when compulsory, does no harm to the body; but knowledge which is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind.
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Plato, The Republic
Everything that deceives may be said to enchant.
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Plato, The Republic
He who is of calm and happy nature will hardly feel the pressure of age, but to him who is of an opposite disposition youth and age are equally a burden.
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Plato, The Republic
I have hardly ever known a mathematician who was capable of reasoning.
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Plato, The Republic
Mankind censure injustice fearing that they may be the victims of it, and not because they shrink from committing it.
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Plato, The Republic
Necessity, who is the mother of invention.
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Plato, The Republic
The beginning is the most important part of the work.
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Plato, The Republic
The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future life.
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Plato, The Republic
The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness...This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector.
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Plato, The Republic
The soul of man is immortal and imperishable.
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Plato, The Republic
There are three arts which are concerned with all things: one which uses, another which makes, and a third which imitates them.
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Plato, The Republic
Wealth is the parent of luxury and indolence, and poverty of meanness and viciousness, and both of discontent.
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Plato, The Republic
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