Quotations by Author

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)
English novelist [more author details]
Showing quotations 11 to 30 of 56 total Next Page ->
     - Read the works of Jane Austen online at The Literature Page
It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
Nothing amuses me more than the easy manner with which everybody settles the abundance of those who have a great deal less than themselves.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
Oh! Do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
Where any one body of educated men, of whatever denomination, are condemned indiscriminately, there must be a deficiency of information, or...of something else.
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Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
But when a young lady is to be a heroine, the perverseness of forty surrounding families cannot prevent her. Something must and will happen to throw a hero in her way.
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Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
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Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey
In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes.
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Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, 1818
A persuadable temper might sometimes be as much in favour of happiness as a very resolute character.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Everybody has their taste in noises as well as in other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Family connexions were always worth preserving, good company always worth seeking.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Good company requires only birth, education, and manners, and with regard to education is not very nice. Birth and good manners are essential; but a little learning is by no means a dangerous thing in good company; on the contrary, it will do very well.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial; but generally speaking, it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber: it is selfishness and impatience rather than generosity and fortitude, that one hears of. There is so little real friendship in the world! and unfortunately, there are so many who forget to think seriously till it is almost too late.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
How could it be? She watched, observed, reflected, and finally determined that this was not a case of fortitude or of resignation only. A submissive spirit might be patient, a strong understanding would supply resolution, but here was something more; here was that elasticity of mind, that disposition to be comforted, that power of turning readily from evil to good, and of finding employment which carried her out of herself, which was from nature alone. It was the choicest gift of Heaven.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Showing quotations 11 to 30 of 56 total.
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