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Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)
British author, mathematician, & philosopher [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Bertrand Russell online at The Literature Page
This is one of those views which are so absolutely absurd that only very learned men could possibly adopt them.
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Bertrand Russell
This is patently absurd; but whoever wishes to become a philosopher must learn not to be frightened by absurdities.
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Bertrand Russell
To be without some of the things you want is an indispensable part of happiness.
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Bertrand Russell
Too little liberty brings stagnation and too much brings chaos.
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Bertrand Russell
War does not determine who is right - only who is left.
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Bertrand Russell
What the world needs is not dogma but an attitude of scientific inquiry combined with a belief that the torture of millions is not desirable, whether inflicted by Stalin or by a Deity imagined in the likeness of the believer.
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Bertrand Russell
Why is propaganda so much more successful when it stirs up hatred than when it tries to stir up friendly feeling?
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Bertrand Russell
Not to be absolutely certain is, I think, one of the essential things in rationality.
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Bertrand Russell, "Am I An Atheist Or An Agnostic?", 1947
When one admits that nothing is certain one must, I think, also admit that some things are much more nearly certain than others.
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Bertrand Russell, "Am I An Atheist Or An Agnostic?", 1947
When one admits that nothing is certain one must, I think, also admit that some things are much more nearly certain than others. It is much more nearly certain that we are assembled here tonight than it is that this or that political party is in the right. Certainly there are degrees of certainty, and one should be very careful to emphasize that fact, because otherwise one is landed in an utter skepticism, and complete skepticism would, of course, be totally barren and completely useless.
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Bertrand Russell, "Am I An Atheist Or An Agnostic?", 1947
Men who are unhappy, like men who sleep badly, are always proud of the fact.
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Bertrand Russell, Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 1
A sense of duty is useful in work, but offensive in personal relations. People wish to be liked, not be endured with patient resignation.
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Bertrand Russell, Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 10
Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.
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Bertrand Russell, Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 12
To be able to fill leisure intelligently is the last product of civilization, and at present very few people have reached this level.
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Bertrand Russell, Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 14
One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important.
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Bertrand Russell, Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 5
One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways.
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Bertrand Russell, Conquest of Happiness (1930) ch. 9
Aristotle maintained that women have fewer teeth than men; although he was twice married, it never occurred to him to verify this statement by examining his wives' mouths.
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Bertrand Russell, Impact of Science on Society (1952) ch. 1
To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.
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Bertrand Russell, Marriage and Morals (1929) ch. 19
The fact that an opinion has been widely held is no evidence whatever that it is not utterly absurd; indeed in view of the silliness of the majority of mankind, a widespread belief is more likely to be foolish than sensible.
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Bertrand Russell, Marriage and Morals (1929) ch. 5
Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.
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Bertrand Russell, Mysticism and Logic (1917) ch. 4
Showing quotations 41 to 60 of 68 total.
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