Quotations by Author

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)
16th president of US [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Abraham Lincoln online at The Literature Page
Tact is the ability to describe others as they see themselves.
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Abraham Lincoln
That some should be rich, shows that others may become rich, and, hence, is just encouragement to industry and enterprise.
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Abraham Lincoln
The probability that we may fail in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just.
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Abraham Lincoln
There has never been but one question in all civilization-how to keep a few men from saying to many men: You work and earn bread and we will eat it.
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Abraham Lincoln
Whatever you are, be a good one.
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Abraham Lincoln
When the conduct of men is designed to be influenced, persuasion, kind unassuming persuasion, should ever be adopted. It is an old and true maxim that 'a drop of honey catches more flies than a gallon of gall.' So with men. If you would win a man to your cause, first convince him that you are his sincere friend. Therein is a drop of honey that catches his heart, which, say what he will, is the great highroad to his reason, and which, once gained, you will find but little trouble in convincing him of the justice of your cause, if indeed that cause is really a good one.
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Abraham Lincoln
When you have got an elephant by the hind leg, and he is trying to run away, it's best to let him run.
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Abraham Lincoln
Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.
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Abraham Lincoln
You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.
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Abraham Lincoln
You may deceive all the people part of the time, and part of the people all the time, but not all the people all the time.
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Abraham Lincoln
'Tis better to be silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.
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Abraham Lincoln, (attributed)
When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.
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Abraham Lincoln, (attributed)
You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time.
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Abraham Lincoln, (attributed)
The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country.
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Abraham Lincoln, Annual message to Congress, December 1, 1862
There is an important sense in which government is distinctive from administration. One is perpetual, the other is temporary and changeable. A man may be loyal to his government and yet oppose the particular principles and methods of administration.
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Abraham Lincoln, Congressional Record, April 15, 1942
While the people retain their virtue, and vigilance, no administration, by any extreme of wickedness or folly, can very seriously injure the government, in the short space of four years.
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Abraham Lincoln, First Inaugural Adress, march 4, 1861
I do the very best I know how-the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what is said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference.
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Abraham Lincoln, Francis Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, 1867
People who like this sort of thing will find this the sort of thing they like.
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Abraham Lincoln, in a book review
Quarrel not at all. No man resolved to make the most of himself can spare time for personal contention.
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Abraham Lincoln, in a letter to J. M. Cutts, October 26, 1863
Truth is generally the best vindication against slander.
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Abraham Lincoln, letter to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, July 18, 1864
Showing quotations 21 to 40 of 46 total.
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