Quotations by Subject

Quotations by Subject: Love
(Related Subjects: Sex, Marriage, Friendship, Charity)
Showing quotations 121 to 150 of 161 quotations in our collections
If love be blind, it best agrees with night.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Romeo and Juliet, Act III, sc. 2
If love be blind, love cannot hit the mark.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Romeo and Juliet, Act II, sc. 1
If that the world and love were young,
And truth in every shepherd's tongue,
These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee and be thy love.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Passionate Pilgrim
If they love they know not why, they hate upon no better ground, they hate upon no better a ground.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Coriolanus, Act II, sc. 2
Is love a tender thing? It is too rough, too rude, too boist'rous, and it pricks like a thorn.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Romeo and Juliet, Act I, sc. 4
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments: love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Sonnet cxvi
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments: love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove :
O, no! it is an ever fixed mark.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Sonnet CXVI
Love all, trust a few. Do wrong to none.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), "All's Well That Ends Well", Act 1 Scene 1
Love is begun by time; and that I see in passages of proof, time qualifies the spark and fire of it. There lives within the very flame of love a kind of wick or snuff that will abate it.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Hamlet, Act IV, sc. 7
Love is blind, and lovers cannot see the pretty follies that themselves commit.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Merchant of Venice, Act II, sc. 6
Love lacked a dwelling, and made him her place;
And when in his fair parts she did abide,
She was lodged and newly deified.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), A Lover's Complaint
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind; and therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act I, sc. 1
Love sought is good, but given unsought is better.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Twelfth Night, Act III, sc. 1
Love surfeits not, Lust like a glutton dies;
Love is all truth, Lust full of forged lies.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Venus and Adonis
Love thrives not in the heart that shadows dreadeth.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Rape of Lucrece
Love's best habit is a soothing tongue.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Passionate Pilgrim
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Sonnet CXVI
Love's reason's without reason.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Cymbeline, Act IV, sc. 2
My bounty is as boundless as the sea, my love love as deep; the more I give to thee, the more I have, for both are infinite.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Romeo and Juliet, Act II, sc. 2
My love admits no qualifying dross.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Troilus and Cressida, Act IV, sc. 4
My love is strengthen'd, though more weak in seeming;
I love not less, though less the show appear:
That love is merchandised whose rich esteeming
The owner's tongue doth publish every where.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Sonnet CII
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips' red...
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Sonnet CXXX
Now my love is thaw'd; which, like a waxen image 'gainst a fire, bears no impression of the thing it was.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act II, sc. 4
O, how this spring of love resembleth the uncertain glory of an April day!
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act I, sc. 3
O, then, what graces in my love do dwell, that he hath turn'd a heaven unto hell!
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act I, sc. 1
Perdition catch my soul, but I do love thee! and when I love thee not, Chaos is come again.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Othello, Act III, sc. 3
Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin as self-neglecting.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Henry V, Act 2, sc. 4
She cannot love, nor take no shape nor project or affection, she is so self-endeared.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Much Ado About Nothing, Act III, sc. 1
Some cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), Much Ado About Nothing, Act III, sc. 1
The chameleon Love can feed on the air.
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William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act II, sc.1
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Showing quotations 121 to 150 of 161 quotations in our collections
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