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Results of search for Author: Joseph Addison - Page 3 of 3
Showing results 21 to 30 of 30 total quotations found.
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Results from Rand Lindsly's Quotations:

Laughter, while it lasts, slackens and unbraces the mind, weakens the faculties, and causes a kind of remissness and dissolution in all the powers of the soul.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Results from Poor Man's College:

I think I may define taste to be that faculty of the soul which discerns the beauties of an author with pleasure, and the imperfections with dislike.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
To be exempt from the passions with which others are tormented, is the only pleasing solitude.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
From social intercourse are derived some of the highest enjoyments of life; where there is a free interchange of sentiments the mind acquires new ideas, and by frequent exercise of its powers, the understanding gains fresh vigor.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
Laughter, while it lasts, slackens and unbraces the mind, weakens the faculties and causes a kind of remissness and dissolution in all the powers of the soul; and thus it may be looked on as weakness in the composition of human nature. But if we consider the frequent reliefs we receive from it and how often it breaks the gloom which is apt to depress the mind and damp our spirits, with transient, unexpected gleams of joy, one would take care not to grow too wise for so great a pleasure of life.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
The friendships of the world are oft confederacies in vice, or leagues of pleasures.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
There are many shining qualities on the mind of man; but none so useful as discretion. It is this which gives a value to all the rest, and sets them at work in their proper places, and turns them to the advantage of their possessor. Without it, learning is pedantry; wit, impertinence; virtue itself looks like weakness; and the best parts only qualify a man to be more sprightly in errors, and active to his own prejudice. Though a man has all other perfections and wants discretion, he will be of no great consequence in the world; but if he has this single talent in perfection, and but a common share of others, he may do what he pleases in his station of life.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity. These are but trifles, to be sure; but, scattered along life's pathway, the good they do is inconceivable.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
He who would pass his declining years with honor and comfort, should, when young, consider that he may one day become old, and remember when he is old, that he has once been young.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body; it preserves constant ease and serenity within us; and more than countervails all the calamities and afflictions which can befall us from without.
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Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)
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Results of search for Author: Joseph Addison - Page 3 of 3
Showing results 21 to 30 of 30 total quotations found.

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