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Results of search for Author: Adam Smith - Page 1 of 1
Showing results 1 to 7 of 7 total quotations found.

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No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable.
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790)
A person who can acquire no property, can have no other interest but to eat as much, and to labour as little as possible. Whatever work he does beyond what is sufficient to purchase his own maintenance can be squeezed out of him by violence only, and not by any interest of his own.
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790)
The affluence of the rich excites the indignation of the poor, who are often both driven by want, and prompted by envy, to invade his possessions.
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790)
Where there is no property, or at least none that exceeds the value of two or three days' labour, civil government is not so necessary.
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790)
The man whose whole life is spent in performing a few simple operations, of which the effects are perhaps always the same, or very nearly the same, has no occasion to exert his understanding or to exercise his invention in finding out expedients for removing difficulties which never occur. He naturally loses, therefore, the habit of such exertion, and generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become.
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790)
The difference of natural talents in different men is, in reality, much less than we are aware of; and the very different genius which appears to distinguish men of different professions, when grown up to maturity, is not upon many occasions so much the cause as the effect of the division of labour. The difference between the most dissimilar characters, between a philosopher and a common street porter, for example, seems to arise not so much from nature as from habit, custom, and education. When they came into the world, and for the first six or eight years of their existence, they were perhaps very much alike, and neither their parents nor playfellows could perceive any remarkable difference...
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790)
All for ourselves and nothing for other people seems, in every age of the world, to have been the vile maxim of the masters of mankind.
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Adam Smith (1723 - 1790), The Wealth of Nations, 1776
Results of search for Author: Adam Smith - Page 1 of 1
Showing results 1 to 7 of 7 total quotations found.

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