Quotations by Author

Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)
English novelist [more author details]
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     - Read the works of Jane Austen online at The Literature Page
In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes.
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Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, 1818
A persuadable temper might sometimes be as much in favour of happiness as a very resolute character.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Everybody has their taste in noises as well as in other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Family connexions were always worth preserving, good company always worth seeking.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Good company requires only birth, education, and manners, and with regard to education is not very nice. Birth and good manners are essential; but a little learning is by no means a dangerous thing in good company; on the contrary, it will do very well.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial; but generally speaking, it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber: it is selfishness and impatience rather than generosity and fortitude, that one hears of. There is so little real friendship in the world! and unfortunately, there are so many who forget to think seriously till it is almost too late.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
How could it be? She watched, observed, reflected, and finally determined that this was not a case of fortitude or of resignation only. A submissive spirit might be patient, a strong understanding would supply resolution, but here was something more; here was that elasticity of mind, that disposition to be comforted, that power of turning readily from evil to good, and of finding employment which carried her out of herself, which was from nature alone. It was the choicest gift of Heaven.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
I can safely say, that the happiest part of my life has been spent on board a ship.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
It was the misfortune of poetry to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
Knowing their feelings as she did, it was a most attractive picture of happiness to her. She always watched them as long as she could, delighted to fancy she understood what they might be talking of, as they walked along in happy independence, or equally delighted to see the Admiral's hearty shake of the hand when he encountered an old friend, and observe their eagerness of conversation when occasionally forming into a little knot of the navy, Mrs Croft looking as intelligent and keen as any of the officers around her.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
The only time I ever really suffered in body or mind, the only time that I ever fancied myself unwell, or had any ideas of danger, was the winter that I passed by myself. As long as we could be together, nothing ever ailed me, and I never met with the smallest inconvenience.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.
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Jane Austen, Persuasion, 1818
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