Quotations and Literature Forum

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:13 am 
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Hello,

in the book "Parrot and Olivier in America" by Peter Carey, I came across the above mentioned sentence.

Context: A servant called Parrot expresses his view on Wordsworth. In response to this, his master thinks:

"A servant quoting literature, a Parrot, Perroquet. A Parrot rather, for in my sence he talks by roat."

The above mentioned sentence is in italics, so I suppose it is a quotation, but I don't know where from.

Could you, please, help me?

Many thanks.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:42 pm 
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From a play by Edward Howard entitled The Six Days Adventure, or The New Utopia written in 1671. That is why sense is "sence" and rote is "roat." It means the parrot talks by rote memory.


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