Quotations and Literature Forum

It is currently Tue Jul 29, 2014 1:43 am

All times are UTC - 7 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Mystery and Crime Novels
PostPosted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 7:51 pm 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2005 2:10 pm
Posts: 355
I'm an Agatha Christie fan and in the past several months, I've started to branch out to other authors. I've read Ian Rankin's Resurrection Men, am about halfway through Anne Perry's Southampton Row, and have started Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly. I've used the various mystery awards to make my choices...like the Edgar, Agatha, Macavity, Dagger, etc.

Is anyone else a mystery fan? If so what do you like?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:31 am 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2003 5:05 pm
Posts: 634
Location: Within the dark labyrinth of the mind
In general I am not usually a big mystery fan, but I have read a few that I have liked, most the mystery books I enjoy deal with the past in someway. For example there is this sieries of mystery books I enjoy called the Sister Frevisse Medieval Mystery's, and they are about this nun in the middle ages who happens to always find herself in the posistion of having a murder to solve. And I am reading a book right now called Cursed in the Blood which is a mystery story that takes place in the middle ages as well, and there were a couple of Victorian mysteris I have enjoyed, Deadly Illumination and Lady Audley's Secret

_________________
Every man carries a circle of hell around his head like a halo. Every man, every man has to go through hell to reach his paradise.
Robert De Niro, Cape Fear


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 8:18 pm 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2005 2:10 pm
Posts: 355
Thanks, Romeo, I looked up the Medieval ones that you mentioned and they look interesting. My only experience with mystery in that time is watching an old TV series (thanks to Netflix) called "Cadfael" who was a monk and an herbalist who uses his knowledge of plants to help solve crimes. Sounds kind of preposterous but it was done very cleverly and it worked. It was adapted from novels.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 10:56 pm 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2003 5:05 pm
Posts: 634
Location: Within the dark labyrinth of the mind
That sounds intresting, it reminds me of this other story though I cannot remeber what it is called off the top of my head, and I cannot find it on my book shelf now, cause a while back I sort of rearagned things so it is no longer up in front like it use to be, but it was also some mideavil type mystery that envolved a monk.

_________________
Every man carries a circle of hell around his head like a halo. Every man, every man has to go through hell to reach his paradise.
Robert De Niro, Cape Fear


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 3:22 pm 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 5:06 pm
Posts: 523
i wonder patricia cornwell's books. anyone read ?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 1:33 pm 
Offline
New member
New member

Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 2:25 am
Posts: 7
Location: Cyprus
Yes I've read quite a few of Patricia Cornwell's books and almost all of Agatha Christie's. I love mystery books but it has to be a well written story with well developped characters and clever plots. A book I really liked was Stephen White's 'Missing Persons' which was based on a true story.

I really like trying to solve the mystery. I love to figure out what the solution is. What I noticed though in Agatha Christie's book is not that the murderer is cleverly hidden and that's the reason you can't figure it out but because she doesn't present all the facts that finally allow the detective to put two and two together. That kind of turned me off. What do you think?

PS. Ofcourse I love how I always know it's the most improbable character and even though find who it is at the beginning her writting is so ingenious that I changed my mind a thousand times and in the end find out that it was him at the first place!

_________________
Love does things for reasons,
Reason cannot understand!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 4:33 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 7:46 am
Posts: 28
Location: Annapolis, Maryland, USA
My favorite mystery writer is the Belgian author, George Simenon. He is best known for his Inspector Maigret novels, and he also writes psychological novels. I'm partial to British mystery writers, my favorites being Ruth Rendell, Barbara Vine (a pseudonym of Ruth Rendell), Colin Dexter, Minette Walters, and the American author of British detective mysteries, Elizabeth George. I do like Agatha Christie, especially herHercule Poirot mysteries. and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes.

_________________
Liz


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 4:23 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:00 am
Posts: 11
How about the Rumpole of the Bailey books by Mortimer? They are great. And the PBS series is so good. Totally love both.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 6:38 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 7:46 am
Posts: 28
Location: Annapolis, Maryland, USA
tantieeb wrote:
How about the Rumpole of the Bailey books by Mortimer? They are great. And the PBS series is so good. Totally love both.


Oh yes, I agree! I have the book and the series. :D

_________________
Liz


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:12 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:00 am
Posts: 11
oceanflower wrote:
tantieeb wrote:
How about the Rumpole of the Bailey books by Mortimer? They are great. And the PBS series is so good. Totally love both.


Oh yes, I agree! I have the book and the series. :D


PD James is really good, too...but no humor like in the Rumpole stories.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:18 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2005 7:46 am
Posts: 28
Location: Annapolis, Maryland, USA
tantieeb wrote:
oceanflower wrote:
tantieeb wrote:
How about the Rumpole of the Bailey books by Mortimer? They are great. And the PBS series is so good. Totally love both.


Oh yes, I agree! I have the book and the series. :D


PD James is really good, too...but no humor like in the Rumpole stories.


I agree as well. :) I've read all of her books. I'm partial to British mysteries.

_________________
Liz


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:37 pm 
Offline
Member
Member

Joined: Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:00 am
Posts: 11
oceanflower wrote:
tantieeb wrote:
oceanflower wrote:
tantieeb wrote:
How about the Rumpole of the Bailey books by Mortimer? They are great. And the PBS series is so good. Totally love both.


Oh yes, I agree! I have the book and the series. :D


PD James is really good, too...but no humor like in the Rumpole stories.


I agree as well. :) I've read all of her books. I'm partial to British mysteries.


I am as well. What is it about them that makes them so good? Agatha Christie books were my first taste--and I was hooked. People say that oh, they're so plot-driven. Well, if it's a mystery, it almost HAS to be. That's one thing I have to say about Mortimer and James especially--lots of characters you can sink your teeth into, if you know what I mean...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 9:28 am 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2005 2:10 pm
Posts: 355
I like going back and forth between British and US authors for the change in atmosphere.

I also like PD James - though, when I was very into Agatha with her sparse character and scene development, I found it hard to get through all the descriptions.

I've started reading Anne Perry and I like her Thomas Pitt series.

Michael Bond, British, who wrote Paddington Bear stories, writes a touch risque but fun stories about a French restaurant critic and his dog whose mind is active in the narrative - from a dogs point of view. The detective/critic's name is Pamplemousse.

Some US writers that I like are Michael Connelly, Ross Thomas and Max Allen Collins.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 6:02 pm 
Offline
QuoteMaster
QuoteMaster

Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 6:27 am
Posts: 265
Location: uconn
ever read the maltese falcon? that's a good one. it's probably my favorite mystery novel of all time.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 8:59 pm 
Offline
New member
New member

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 5:00 pm
Posts: 8
Have you ever read any James Pattersons? I just finished reading his new one and I think they're great.

_________________
"The Man In Black fled across the desert, and the Gunslinger followed."
-Stephen King


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group