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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2002 4:04 am 
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This has been bothering me since I saw it again on Farscape, from the semi-insane lips of John Crichton. The quote/song is:

You take the high road, and I'll take the low road....

Where did this start, and whats the rest of the song?


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2002 4:43 am 
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It's a traditional Scottish song, "Loch Lomond".
Quote:
Oh! ye'll take the high road and
I'll take the low road,
And I'll be in Scotland afore ye;
But me and my true love
Will never meet again
On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.


This site has the full lyrics and even a MIDI of the tune:
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids/lyrics/lochlomond.htm

Scottish legend says that when a Scot dies at war his soul returns to Scotland, and that's what "the low road" refers to here. At least that's my recollection.

BTW, I'm a fan of Farscape too. I wish my cable provider would put the Sci-Fi channel back on the lineup.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2002 1:52 am 
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Preciate it


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2002 1:54 am 
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We use satellite. Saves the hassle.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2002 7:49 am 
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By a familiar chain of associations I remember the dark wood where Dante discovered the "low road" that leads to hell...and what Robert Frost had to say about that same spot...

The Road Not Taken


TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;


Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,


And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.


I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

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What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 2:33 am 
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The Road Not Taken has always been one of my favorite poems. I don't manage to appreciate poetry much but that one always resonates for me.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 7:15 am 
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It's only one of Frost's many allusions to the opening of "Inferno":

In the middle of our life's journey
I found myself in a dark wood
Where the straight way was lost.



Frost affected the pose of the simple farmer, but he was a well educated man, and much influenced by Dante. See also his "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" and "Come In."

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 5:22 pm 
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"Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it. But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it."
~Bible, New International Version, Matthew 7:13-14
http://www.sfu.ca/~wipperma/scripture.htm

Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat:
Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.
~Bible, King James Version, Matthew 7: 13-14

“Sometimes the road less travelled is less travelled for a reason.” - Jerry Seinfeld

"The road less travelled is great until you need a tow-truck"

Whether it is Meredith writing in “Modern Love” in England of the 1860s, or Vyasa dictating to Ganesha in India’s mythic past, the finger points unwaveringly not outwards at the other, but inwards at oneself. The moving finger writes and having writ moves on, but it is the individual who is responsible for making that choice, thinking that thought, feeling that emotion, doing that act which sets off the inexorable chakra of karma, and not just blind nemesis that visits unjustified calamity on his head. The Indian insight into this law was voiced memorably by Robert Frost...
http://www.indianest.com/hinduism/004.htm

After Frost's wife died in the thirties, he stepped up the pace of his public readings. He must have gotten consolation from being Robert Frost, from being the image of himself that he had perfected with such genius. I have heard him say mockingly that hell was a half-filled auditorium. This was a hell he never had to suffer. Year after year after year, he was as great a drawing-card as Dylan Thomas was in his brief prime. Yet there was a strain; never in his life was he able to eat before a reading. A mutual friend of ours once said with pity, "It's sad to see Frost storming about the country when he might have been an honest schoolteacher."
Frost had an insatiable yearning for crowds, circles of listeners, single listeners—and even for solitude. Can we believe him when he says he "took the road less travelled by"? He ran, I think, in no tracks except the ones he made for himself.
~Robert Lowell discussing Robert Frost
The New York Review of Books, FEBRUARY 1, 1963
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/13769

To seriously embrace the holy day of the Ascension, demands more of us than a wish to believe that the Gospel's are correct, authorative or true - it demands of us to inspect the Gnostic's aspiration as our own: to ascend beyond the boundaries of this fixation and all its authorities, its why's and wherefores - it's do´s and don'ts . If the earthly are absolved of its weight in such a manner - that physical and moral gravity no longer restrict its movement - it is truly transliterated into that which the mind holds heavenly and sublime.. and through that glorious liberation, the breach between the two are canceled, and to our vision's eye are revealed a road less travelled, a winding stair of existence towards unsurpassed glory and fullness. So, at least I myself - see the event and image of the Ascension of Christ - as a type for the reintegration of all beings into one eternal communion with Divine Reality.
~ "terje" at http://terje.bergersen.net/mt/archives/2002_05.html

Spiritual Pioneers
By Revd. J.R (Regina) Hyland
Like most of us who have come to understand the sinfulness involved in our treatment of non human creatures, the writer did not learn this in her church, or through her association with other Christians. She learned it through direct experience, and a willingness to accept what that experience was trying to teach her.
But not everyone is as open as she was to this inner prompting. Not everyone is willing to make the changes that such insights require. As with any area of spiritual evolution, those who first respond, do so on an individual basis.
This puts those of us who understand where God's Spirit is trying to lead, in the position of being spiritual pioneers.
We are walking a road less travelled and, as with any pioneering effort, it is often a difficult and discouraging journey.
So it is important to remember that in the very act of committing ourselves to this path, the ill-defined road becomes better marked and easier to travel. As we journey on, and our numbers increase, the road less travelled becomes more visible and more accessible.
The few become many; the many become a multitude.
And when this comes to pass, neither the churches nor the general public will be able to dismiss the issue of animal rights and welfare as a matter of concern only to special interest or fringe groups.
What was a pioneering effort will become a highly visible issue within the larger society. And when it does-- as it surely will-- it will be understood that the need to extend God's concern and compassion to all creatures is crucial for the well-being of human beings, as well as for the animals. Man, himself, will never have the blessings of a millennial world until he stops his abuse of other human beings, and of all other creatures.
~Reprinted from the March/April 1998 issue of Humane Religion. Copyright 1998 by Viatoris Ministries

Quotations from The Road Less Travelled by M. Scott Peck:

"Because genuine love involves an extension of oneself, vast amounts of energy are required. So, like it or not, we simply cannot love everyone."

"Life is difficult. This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths. It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it. Once we truly know that life is difficult - once we truly understand and accept it - then life is no longer difficult. Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters."

"Love is the free exercise of choice. Two People love each other only when they are quite capable of living without each other but choose to live with each other."

"Love....is a form of work or a form of courage. Specifically, it is work or courage directed toward the nurture of our own or another's spiritual growth."


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2002 6:48 am 
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Dear Thenostromo,

You've covered the high road, the low road, and all roads in between. Well maybe you missed the Road to Rio and a few others, but anyway...

Many thanks for the good thoughts... and the laughs, too.

Truly, the Quotations Page is a journey, not a destination.

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True wit is nature to advantage dressed,
What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed.


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