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 Post subject: Food and Restaurants
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2002 12:33 pm 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
Colonial Harland Sanders promoted his fried chicken as "finger licking good." Back in the summer I was working in Haywood County. Somedays I would slip over to Mason, Tennessee, in Tipton County, to eat at Gus's Fried Chicken. Prior to this past summer I had never eaten there. It is just down the street from Bozo's Bar-B-Q. Bozo's is a really great place to eat. Their specialy is hickory smoked pork bar-b-q. I guess that I was so fasinated with Bozo's that I neglected to eat at Gus's. One day I tried some of Gus's "World Famous" fried chicken. The building is fairly new because the original building burned down a few years ago. The fried chicken is served with a side of two pieces of plain white loaf bread. It was a unique experience but I didn't think that the chicken was good enough to be "world famous."

After I left the restaurant the taste of that chicken kept growing on me. By the time I got back to Jackson I had worked up an appetite. I asked my wife if she had ever heard of Gus's? She said she had read newspaper and magazine articles about it. She asked me how I liked it? I described it as a rare version of fried chicken like no other that I had ever tried. It seemed to have a bar-b-q flavor or an aftertaste.

During the night I was having dreams about going to Gus's Fried Chicken. You know the food is better than "good" when you dream about eating it during your sleep. :)

http://www.legislature.state.tn.us/bill ... JR0252.pdf
http://www5d.biglobe.ne.jp/~tod/gussworld.html


Last edited by Phantom_Delta on Fri Apr 04, 2003 1:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2002 12:38 pm 
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The Queen and I had our first date at Boyett's Dinning Room at Reelfoot Lake. Boyett's specialty is fried catfish and Tennessee County Ham. This was during our college era of the late 70's. We managed to go up to Boyett's about every 5 years or so. Since I travel I am able to go to Boyett's or The Bluebank Restaurant once or twice each year. Back in April of this year I took my son fishing at Reelfoot and we went to The Bluebank for a fine catfish dinner. It was his 17th birthday gift from me. I gave him the choice of a guiding fishing trip or cash. He elected to take the cash so I gave him $100.00 and we fished from the boardwalk for free. I caught one plump crappie but that fish managed to escape from my fish basket. (Spare the skillet and spoil the fish.) On the way home I gave him a brief tour of UTM and the Phi Sigma Kappa House.

http://www.virtualtourist.com/m/1f5e4/527/2/


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2002 12:03 pm 
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Delightfully Tacky, Yet Unrefined

--Hooters

I enjoy going to eat at H(O)(O)ters because I really like the chili dogs. :D


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2002 8:13 am 
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This morning I asked my wife to name three of her favorite restaurants?

The Macaroni Grill in Franklin, Tennessee, came up first.
Chelsey's in Mountain Home, Arkansas, came up second.
The Rainforest Cafe in Nashville, Tennessee, came up third.

I asked her why she favored the Macaroin Grill? She said it was a combination of good food, good service, an appealing/affluent atmosphere and congenial company. She said the waitress was a Voice Student at Vanderbilt Universtiy in Nashville. She said the waitres sang an Italian Opera song to them (in Italian). (She was having lunch with peers.)

I can remember that we ate at Chelsey's in Mountain Home for our 10th anniversary celebration. (We had lodged in Mountain Home all week so I could fish for trout every morning while she slept late or laid out at the pool. ) I can remember that we had twice baked potatoes with filet mignon. They brought us two complimentry servings of cheese cake for dessert.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2002 2:24 pm 
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When I think of restaurants I tend to think of good food. Good food often brings back pleasant memories of eating out. Back in October of 1991 I was camped (alone) on the bank of the White River in Cotter, Arkansas. Cotter is a small town with a sign at the city limits that reads: Welcome to Cotter, Trout Capitol of the World. The campground was on one side of the river and the town was on the opposite side. Like most small towns, there was a small town café with one cute and sassy waitress. Each morning I would go to Roundhouse Rapids then wade out through the fog to fish the White. Typically I would fish until 10:00 a.m. By the time I got my fish dressed and my waders off it was time for coffee and a late breakfast (or an early lunch). On the first morning of the seven-day tour I walked into the Cotter Café with a robust appetite. Ms. Cute & Sassy came out to take my order. I told her that I would have hot baloney eggs-n-gravy grits & taters. My request caught her off guard. She hesitated a bit then wrote the order down on her pad. It was after she went back into the kitchen when I heard uncontrolled laughter bouncing off the walls and resounding through the building. A minute later she brought me a cup of hot coffee then walked back into the kitchen. I noticed that it pained her a bit to keep a straight face. Since I was the only man in the house it didn’t bother me at all.

Well, I just sat there and enjoyed the coffee. The place was Plain Jane, generic in every sense—salt & pepper bottles on the table—a red & white checkered table clothe—Dime Store silverware—a bottle of hot dope. No one was in the place but the cook, the waitress and myself. It was my kind of place, my kind of atmosphere—small town USA. Ms Cute & Sassy brought me a platter of fried baloney, eggs & gravy, grits & hash browned potatoes. This was the first time that I had ever ordered the hot baloney special and actually had it delivered. The cook had to make a special trip to the grocery store to buy the baloney.

The only thing better than good food is a cute & sassy waitress with a sense of humor. :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2002 8:36 am 
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During the week of my fishing tour in 1991 I managed to eat a late breakfast or an early lunch at the Cotter Cafe everyday. By day three, the waitress and I were aquainted on a full name basis. She asked me one day, "what do you like best about Arkansas?" I said that the fishing was good but the service at the Cotter Cafe was the best thing that Arkansas had going for it. She thought that was delightfull. I told her that if I weren't already married then I would consider moving to Cotter. She said that if she wasn't already married she might consider moving to Tennessee.

On the last day of my tour the waitress was not scheduled to work. I skipped breakfast then packed up and drove to Mountain Home. There was a place called the Back Forty and it was my last stop in Arkansas. My wife and I had eaten lunch there during the summer of 1990. The Back Forty was as much of a beer joint as a restaurant. The place had the most unique rural atmosphere. On the outside it looked like a genuine red barn and even had a tin roof. The inside was rustic. The walls and floor were constructed with undressed sawmill lumber. Iced tea was served in fruit jars and beer was served in the longneck bottles. The house special was the Back Forty Burger. When I walked into the Back Forty I took a seat at a table then picked up a menue. When the waitress came to take my order she was none other that the same woman who worked at the Cotter Cafe. :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2002 12:25 pm 
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If I had to make a statement about going out to eat it would probably go something like this:

Dining out is a formal luxury but eating out is just a whole lot of fun.

When I "dine out" I have to put on nice clothes and act like I have good sense. When I "eat out" I can enjoy the pleasure of an inexpenive meal and flirt with the waitress. You don't have to worry about such things as dripping food on your clothes or using the wrong fork.

In 1993 The Queen and I sold our first home. We decided to go to the Red Lobster to celebrate. The nearest Red Lobster was more than 100 miles away. I had been to the Red Lobster once but I had never ordered a whole lobster. Since 1993 I have never again ordered a whole lobster because it reminded me of biology lab (when we had to dissect all sorts of little animals in the lab). The waiter gave us a pair of nut crackers when he delivered our order. Since I couldn't figure out how take apart my dinner some guy wearing a white apron had to come out to our table and make a production out of it. It was almost as much trouble as dressing a snapping turtle. When he clamped down on the front pincer, juice squirted out all over creation. Not only was it messy, it was a wee bit embarrassing. Folks sitting near our table were enjoying free entertainment at my expense. I told my wife that eating lobster should be declared a sport.

There is now a Red Lobster in Jackson, Tennessee. It is one of our favorite places to dine but I never order a whole lobster. The lobster tails are quite delicious and a lot less trouble to fool with. Swordfish anyone?


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 Post subject: The Catfish Hotel
PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2002 9:44 am 
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One of my oldest memories of dining out as a young boy belongs to The Catfish Hotel. It was during the spring when the dogwoods were blooming. Dad had just bought a new Buick LeSabre four-door sedan. My older brother and two younger sisters sat in the back seat and I got to ride in the front seat because I was prone to motion sickness (even on short drives). We arrived at The Catfish Hotel (south of Savannah, Tennessee) about 1:30 p.m. The building was in a slight state of disrepair but the “white washed” house was filled with people dressed in Sunday-go-to-meeting-clothes. The aroma of fried fish greeted us at the door. Most of the dinner crowd had thinned. We were seated at a table for six. The Hotel was on the West Bank of the Tennessee River but it was a Hotel in name only.

After what seemed like a protracted wait, platters of fried catfish fiddlers were served at our table. The catfish was served with vinegar slaw, French fries, and hush puppies. Fried fish was both a local cuisine and a delicacy. I had to pick the fish from the bones and we were hastened not to swallow any bones. Liberal amounts of tomato catsup were added to my fries and hush puppies. The hush puppies were quite delicious. My enhanced hunger made the food taste better than usual. We enjoyed a fine family meal. I can recall being very sluggish and a little bit drowsy afterwards. After the meal we toured Shiloh National Park--a tour long remembered.

The Catfish Hotel still ranks as one of my favorite places to eat. The new building is still located on the West Bank of the Tennessee. The hush puppies were franchised a few years ago and can be purchased frozen at many locations in Tennessee.

http://chatt.net/~fs4647/catfish.htm


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 Post subject: Dancing in the Skillet
PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2002 9:06 am 
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There are few things that can be cooked that will dance in the skillet but frog legs are at the top of the list. If you are skeptical then don’t take my word for it. Even I had serious doubts and had to see this for myself. When my Uncle took me frog hunting I was eight years old. We went to a small farm pond after dark. My job was to hold the flashlight steady on the eyes of a frog. Uncle Freddie would shine his light on the frog then sneak ever so quietly to the edge of the pond then gig the rascal. He managed to take about a dozen frogs during my maiden hunt. After the frog legs were dressed he placed them in a pan of salted water and they began to kick. It was a sight that I would never forget. He told me that they would dance in the skillet when you fried them. I couldn’t wait to see this with my own eyes but it would have to wait.

It was almost midnight when I got to bed. When I closed my eyes to sleep the shinning eyes of a bullfrog haunted me. When I finally drifted off to sleep I had frog mares. I dreamed that this giant bullfrog had picked me up. He was about as big as King Kong. I got so nervous that I peed right in his hands. I heard him swear, “dammit, you peed on me!” The frog got mad then pitched me back into the pond. When I woke up I discovered that I had actually wet my bed. Waking up was such a relief that I wasn’t worried about the bed-wetting.

Frog legs were on the menu for our supper the following night. My mother refused to cook them so my Dad stepped in to do the cooking. He heated up a pan of Crisco then placed the first pair of battered frog legs into the skillet. As soon as they were laid into the skillet they began to dance. He added a few more pair and they all began to dance. It was a comical sight that warranted a lot of laughter.

It was said that frog legs tasted like fried chicken. Some people insisted they tasted like fish. They tasted like a combination of catfish and southern fried chicken to me.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2002 7:56 am 
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It is chittlerling season here in Tennessee. Last Thursday my chittlerling eating buddy and I went to The Country Kitchen in Huntingdon, Tennessee. The CK offers "all you can eat" chitterlings every Thursday evening for $9.95. Typically I will eat chitterlings only once every ten years but I got a hankering to go eat them two years in a row. The CK gives you a choice of fried chitterlings or boiled or half and half. I usually do the half and half and have half my boiled chitterlings left over. They are served with slaw, French Fries and hush puppies. My buddy always orders boiled chitterlings. They have the faint flavor (twang) of hog manure. The fried chittlerlings are boiled before they are fried. If you smother them with tomatoe catsup you can hardly tell what you are eating.

As usual, there was a full house of chitterling lovers at the Country Kitchen. By 6:15 p.m we had eaten our fill then paid our tab and left. I went home with chittlerling on my breath. :roll:


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 22, 2002 8:03 am 
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It is close enough to Thanksgiving to give honorable mentions to Turkey Dinners. Traditonally, we eat an oven baked butterball that is served with cornbread dressing, mashed potatoes & giblet gravy, green beans (or green bean casserole), jellied cranberry sauce, and Pillsbury Rolls. Pecan pie is my first choice in a Thanksgiving dessert. In the south we don't "stuff' our turkeys. A turkey will cook much better with an open cavity. Cornbread dressing is about the second best thing that I have ever eaten. :)

Every other year I will smoke a turkey in my Brinkman Smoker. I have to give myself credit for cooking the best turkey that I have ever eaten. Typically I will get up about 1:00 a.m. & fire up the smoker then put the turkey in the drum. I add hickory chips to the charcoal and also put a bottle of Worchestershire sauce in the water pan. I then go back to bed but I will get up at 5:00 a.m. to go deer hunting. The best part of the hunt is coming back to the house to check on the turkey. I usually drink white wine for about an hour before the meal.

Last year my wife and daughter went to visit family on Thanksgiving. My son and I stayed home to hunt. I ended up cooking Swanson Frozen (TV) Turkey Dinners for Thanksgving. They were far less appealing than our traditional Thanksgiving Dinner. I was so dissatified that I went to the store the next day and bought a butterball to cook on the Sunday after Thanksgving.


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 Post subject: Pizza in the Mountains
PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2002 3:12 pm 
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This past October the Queen and I were touring the Smokies. On the third day of our tour we went to the Smoky Mountain Brewery & Restaurant in Gatlinburg. We ordered the large Bar-B-Q pizza and pints of Black Bear Ale. Bar-B-Q pizza is not that common but it was right good eating. The Smoky Mountain Brewery ranks as one of my favorite restuarants. The food is delicious, the beer is great and the servers are right sexy. :roll: Bar-B-Q Pizza is about ten times better than plain Bar-B-Q!

"Heap Good Eating"

http://www.coppercellar.com/restaurants ... ewery.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2002 4:58 pm 
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I asked a few friends what their favorit place to eat in Vermont was and the winner was "Libby's Blue Line Diner" ( doesn't really suprise me)


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2002 3:07 pm 
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We had a Happy Thanksgiving here at Camp Juniper. :D I was really thankful because I capped a deer on 11-24 and another one on 11-26. (I am limited out on deer!) :lol:

The Queen had bought a 14-pound butter ball so I let her bake it in the oven. It was not quite up to gourmet standards but it was right good. My brother in-law gave us a 10-pound butter ball that he got at work. It is in the deep freezer and I will smoke the 10-pounder on Christmas Eve. :D

On 11-29-02 I cooked a turkey version of Brunswick Stew. It was sooooo goood! The Queen is boiling the carcass of the leftover bird to make turkey & dressing for Sunday Dinner. This should finish off MR. TURKEY! :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 01, 2002 3:25 pm 
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are you seriously done with the turkey ALREADY??????!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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