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PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2004 8:53 pm 
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Phantom_Delta wrote:
"Only YOU can prevent forest fires."

--Smokey The Bear



Not to be picky or anything, but his name is SMOKEY BEAR, not "Smokey the Bear". His name and image are protected by Federal Law, so you better watch out!! :)

~~Winnow


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2004 5:42 am 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
Smokey the Bear has misrepresented the truth about forest fires for more than half of a century. About half of all forest fires are caused by lightning.

Only YOU and GOD can prevent forest fires!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2004 8:17 am 
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Hey, I know that. I worked for the Forest Service (and Smokey Bear) for many years. My DH has been on a wildland firefighting team for over thirty years. I know and understand what the Smokey Bear mission is: I preached it. And I still believe in it. How many forest fires are man-caused vs. lightning-caused is not the issue, however (nor is whatever God "may" have to do with it). The issue is being careful with fire. Us, people. Lightning we can't do anything about*. And because more and more people are building homes in marginal areas (the "urban interface"), the risk of man-caused fire increases, and regardless of the cause the potential damage to homes and people (as well as the forest) has increased dramatically. We all still need to be careful with fire. And that's Smokey Bear's message. Smokey Bear is a message for children, and it's a message I hope they remember as they grow up into responsible adults.

You can find info about Smokey Bear at http://www.smokeybear.com
His new message is "Only YOU can prevent wildfires!", although "Only YOU can prevent forest fires!" is still commonly used.

Have a great day! ~~Winnow

*The fact that natural fire is actually GOOD for the forest is another subject ... but this is not the time or place for that discussion.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2004 12:39 pm 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
The forest is my sanctuary and my faith is like a bow.
My quest is pledged to destiny and the arrow is my soul.

The Creed of Phantom Delta
-->>>----------->


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2004 11:25 am 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
He who hunts a mighty buck will prosper most by golden luck.

The Golden Rule of Deer Hunting
--Phantom Delta, 2004


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 Post subject: The Full Moon of August
PostPosted: Thu Jun 24, 2004 11:48 am 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
It was during the full moon of August. Fifty miles from home and alone, I pitched my tent on the bank of the Buffalo River. My campsite was at the end of a one-mile lane at The Crazy Horse Campground. I needed privacy to think and sort things out. In actuality I was contemplating buying the campground. The owner wanted $250,000.00 for one hundred and ten acres. That price included almost 200 canoes, three buildings, and 50 campsites. Of the one hundred and ten acres, 100 acres was utilized for row crop production. The farmland could be rented or leased to a crop producer. The income from the lease would amount to $5,000.00 per year. The income from the canoe rentals and campground fees had averaged about 50,000 per year. The canoeing season was only four months long. 55,000.00 minus expenses and operating cost would net me approximately 25,000.00 per year. The interest on the loan would cost me almost 25,000.00. I decided to offer the owner $85,000.00. The court records indicated that the owner had purchased the whole shooting match for only $65,000.00 only three years prior. As I was doing the math, two pick-up trucks pulled next to my campsite. The folks were just plain obnoxious.

As the evening progressed my neighbors seemed to get drunker and louder. I had done nothing but mind my own business and cook a meal over an open fire. It was sometime during the night after I had crawled into a pup tent when one of my drunken neighbors began shaking my tent. He was calling me a queer (of all things). He was calling me out. I guess he aimed to do me bodily harm. It sounded like there were two or three other men outside the tent with him. And what am I to do? I figured if I came out of the front of my pup tent they would club me or something. I came out of the top of my tent through a cut I made with a long knife. When I stood up in the middle of the tent it caught them by surprise. 8O I pointed the revolver at the nose of the man who was standing closest to the tent. There was silence. The hammer was cocked and I was fully prepared to shoot three men dead. Each of the men dropped something on the ground. I guess they were holding sticks of fire wood. Two of the men raised their arms above their heads.

“Don’t be afraid, this bullet won’t hurt. You want feel a thing but pain.” I said.

I marched the ram-rod of the group almost one mile, by the light of the silvery moon. When we reached the camp store I had him deposit a quarter in the pay phone and call 911. He did. It was after midnight when a County Deputy arrived. They put the ram-rod in the patrol car. The other members of that group were told to pack up and leave immediately. It was almost 2:00 a.m. when I arrived home. My spouse wanted to know why I had come home during the middle of the night. I said that I couldn’t sleep. :roll:


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 28, 2004 8:18 am 
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Under the circumstances, I did not make an offer. The incident or confrontation caused me to realize that I did not want to invest in a business that would put me in a posture to deal with drunken campers.

I have witnessed a number of confrontations on that section of the river. I once saw the owner of that campground punch a belligerent man. It was a swift and decisive blow. The owner of the camp was about 6 feet tall and weighed about 210 pounds. The intimidator stood about 6 feet 5 inches and appeared to be 250 pounds of solid muscle. The punch broke the man's nose.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 29, 2004 7:24 am 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
On June 4th I drove south to Tishomingo State Park in Mississippi to celebrate my birthday by camping out. The weather was absolutely perfect. It was warm enough to be pleasant but cool enough to be comfortable. There was no threat of rain. When I arrived I realized that I had left my Igloo ice chest on the dinning room table. :o The chest contained frozen steaks, bacon, eggs, milk and beverages. I can't recall the last time that I went camping when I didn't forget something (but never my ice chest). My supply of food was limited to one can of beans and one can of corned beef hash. I ended up going to a nearby restaurant to eat a seafood bufffet for supper.

My brother arrived on Saturday, June 5th. We planned to rent a canoe and float Bear Creek. We drove out of the park to a store to buy picnic supplies and food for our evening meal. He purchased some ears of sweet corn, beef steaks, potato chips, bread, ham and cheese. After a picnic lunch in camp we drove to the canoe livery. The six-mile float took only two and one half hours. It was our first float on Bear Creek.

Two hours before sunset I kindled a campfire and also prepared a charcoal fire. I wrapped the ears of corn in aluminum foil and broiled them for half an hour. We were camped near the lakefront and my brother fished as I cooked. I then broiled beef steaks and warmed a can of Bush's Best, boston baken beans, on a camp stove. The meal was really good, especially the corn on the cob. It was sweet and tender. The steaks were tough and chewy but edible. The beans were quite tasty.

After sunset we sat by the fire and played our harmonicas. We talked and recalled camping trips from our early years. We drank light beer. Nothing remarkable happened but the occasion was special in a brotherly way. My brother gave me a new pair of Remington binoculars to commeorate my 47th birthday. :)

"The hours that make us happy make us wise."

--John Mansfield.

http://www.outdoorplaces.com/Destinatio ... ishomingo/


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 Post subject: Dead Snakes Can Bite!
PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2004 1:24 pm 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
About 6500 humans are bitten by poisonous snakes in the U.S. each year. Of those, only about 350 are hunters or fishermen. And the death rate is very low, about 15 persons annually in the entire country. Most of these bites occur from an imaginary line drawn from North Carolina to southern California. More than half occur in Texas, North Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

The head of a snake can still bite through reflex action up to one hour after it is killed.


Vin T. Sparano
Complete Outdoors Encyclopedia
Part 10, First Aid
page 62
----------------------------------------

In 1992 I was bitten by a copperhead snake. It happened right in my own back yard as I was picking up sticks. All of a sudden I felt a sharp injection in the palm of my hand. I saw stars for a moment (my vision went suddenly black and there were sharp, light, objects amid the blackness). When the stars cleared I looked at the palm of my hand to see two small incision holes. "Ive been snake biten!" 8O Remarkably, I remained calm. I guess it was the knowledge that it was not as bad as I had always feared. I was able to identify the snake as a copperhead. It was so camouflaged that it looked like a dead stick. Even though the copperhead is a venomous snake, it turned out that the bite was a non venomous bite. (The snake didn't inject the poision into me when it struck. I was told that this was a common occurance among copperhead victims. ) There was no swelling and I was treated for possible infections. :P

If snake bitten, it is cricitcal for the victim to be able to identify the snake (for the proper antivenin administration).

I now own a pair snake proof boots.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2004 5:55 am 
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I do not know the medical or technical reason. I do know that I have seen stars as a result from concussions. I guess it has something to do with the nervous system.


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