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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 12:53 pm 
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Wilderness bushcraft website, for a place to find all the kit you want.
please go on this webstie and tell everyone, I am having alot of trouble promoting it. :D

If more people dont start using the service it will have to close :(

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Last edited by bushcraft on Tue Apr 27, 2004 12:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2004 5:50 am 
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Location: Jackson, Tennessee
Camp Juniper is a school of campcraft and woodlore. We have Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts over each year. Camp Juniper is the name of the grounds where I reside. I teach a two-hour session on basic campcraft and woodlore. Fire building is covered in the first one-hour session. We begin with identifying woods that are best used for camp fires and woods that ae least desired. I teach fire building techniques and camp fire safety. There are about a dozen different fire lays and the advantages and disadvantages of some are discussed. I favor the lean-too fire lay for starting a fire and I utilize a keyhole fire lay for cooking. Other fire lays that are illustrated include: The Hunter's Fire, Pyramid Fire Lay, The Star Fire or Indian Fire, The Pit Fire (Fire Pit), Log Cabin Fire Lay, and Relector Fire. We also discuss the different types of forest fires.

"Only YOU can prevent forest fires."

--Smokey The Bear

"The campfire is a companion of the soul."
P. Delta

"It is a Wise Woodsman who knows what is biting him."

--Richard P. Frisbee

Camp Shelters are covered in the second one-hour shelter. Water sources and water purification conclude the second one-hour session.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2004 12:48 pm 
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Too Slow Yaar......... :roll:

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2004 12:57 pm 
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The web site is slighlty informational but it lacks appeal. You might consider getting another design that includes some zest and zeal. Your web site should give viewers reasons to want to inquire about programs and prices. Sound effects of a crackling campfire might help. Woodlore is not necessairly an easy subject to promote. Euell Gibbons made Grapnuts Cereal famous by saying, "Grape Nuts, they remind me of the flavor of wild hickory nuts."

http://www.kellogg.nwu.edu/faculty/ster ... e3/10.html


A few years ago I ran across a line at Turtle Island Preserve. Their slogan is, "The finest of the Fine Arts is harmony in human endeavors." (I think) I couldn't read the slogan that well because it was in small print and I thought it said that the finest of Fine Nuts is harmony in human endeavors.

http://www.turtleislandpreserve.com/

In the Phantom Delta School of Woodlore I promote an acronymn. KASHEM.

Knowledge
Attitude
Skills
Habits
Experience
Motivation


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 6:22 am 
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Thanks, it is all really interesting. if you hjave any other ideas or stories please post them hear, as they are great to hear about.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 7:46 am 
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A really clever motto can promote a weekend excursion into the wilderness. I am in the process of coining a new motto for Camp Juniper.

The motto that I have used in the past was borrowed from my cabbage cutting days.

"Do it the hard way or don't do it at all."

That was my motto before Camp Juniper was intended to be a commercial enterprise. It was meant to be funny but it tends to scare kids away.

It is not an easy task to promote a camp when the camp is competing with established camps that are operating as "non profit" ventures. Camp Hazlewood is owned by the Girl Scouts of America and there is no motto for Camp Hazlewood. I call it Camp Hazlenut and it drives the Queen batty. http://www.campchannel.com/camps/2391.html

When operating a camp for kids, the programs have to be balanced between being educational and being fun. The schedule has to be balanced in such a way as to prevent boredom but also in such a way as not to exhaust the kids.

A new motto is in the making.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 12:47 pm 
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when you think of it let me know, and i can sure relate to the old one, off putting but true, it is very interesting hearing about all the camps in the USA, as i my self am in England, it is very interesting to realise how many other camps their are, over hear there are only courses which are fairly expensive. and so is all the kit really, (although all you really need is a knife).

That is the main reason i set up the wilderness bushcraft website as i have spent a long time researching and finding kit i basically find it for people.

Some of the UK surivial/bushcraft schools if anyones interested are:
www.raymears.com - i have 2 courses booked with these people
www.cambriansurvival.co.uk - have been on one of these ones
www.survivalschool.co.uk - havent been but a good place to buy kit, especially the best axes in the world are sold here. (I dont say that lightly either)

also does anyone know how to set up a forum like this?

cheers :)


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2004 2:04 pm 
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I am kicking around some ideas.

Camp Juniper--The only nuts in our camp are little acorns. :D


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2004 10:57 am 
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Personally i think some people may say that could be politically incorrect.
and it doesnt really explain what you do or excite people or motivate them.

umm... what about something like Learn by listening, live by doing.

or something along those lines.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2004 6:05 am 
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When I was in college I took mountaineering and survival through the U.S. Army Resevered Officer's Training Corps, (ROTC) program at UTM. One weekend in the spring we took a Field Training Exercise (FTX) to Fall Creek Falls. They divided us up in pairs and had us to spend the day in those mountains looking for edible plants. My buddy was a college football player and we spent the day on the creek fishing for trout. We had dug worms and rigged up limb lines. I even improvised a fly rod. I caught fish all through the day and we broiled them on an open fire and ate them till we were tired of eating fish.

Late in the day we returned to the base camp and they gave us our choice of a live chicken or a live rabbit. We were required to kill the animal and cook our supper. I wanted the rabbit but my buddy wanted the chicken. (I had never dressed a chicken but I had dressed many rabbits.) Since my partner was bigger than I, we got the chicken.

Well we returned to our campsite which was on the side of a steep bluff. Since Becker wanted the chicken I told him he could dress it. He laid the chicken across a log and commenced to chop the head off of it. I told him that he had better tie the legs together before he decapitated it. He didn't . After he cut the head off our chicken he let go of it. That headless chicken ran right off the side of the bluff and fell more than a 100 feet below. So much for our supper.

I went back to see the Colonial and I told him we needed a rabbit. He wanted to know why he should give me a rabbit. I told him that Becker was big enough to eat a whole chicken by himself. When I came back to camp I had a new chicken for Becker and a rabbit for myslef. :D


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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2004 12:43 pm 
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:lol:

Very funny indeed,

If anyone else has any stories like that please put them hear, and may i use it on my website?
The same goes to any other stories anyone else has.

It is great to hear from other like minded people.

I find when plucking a chicken the feathers go everywhere so a good tip is to do it inside a plastice bag, then most of them are contained.

Have you ever managed to tickle a fish to catch it?

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PostPosted: Mon May 03, 2004 7:49 am 
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The only fishes that I ever caught with my hands were minnows that were in a minnow bucket.
--------------------------

When Becker got his chicken plucked I cut it in half and told him to wrap the halves in some aluminum foil that I had. He started to wrap the chicken with the shiny side out. I informed him that the dull side needed to be on the outside in order to absorb the heat, otherwise the heat would be reflected away and the meat would not cook.

That chicken baked in its own sauces. It was not just edible, it was delicious. :) I baked my rabbit the same way except I added a half a bottle of bar-b-q sauce that I had smuggled into my pack. It was better than delicious. :mrgreen: We each a chicken half and half a rabbit each.

Becker had filled one of his two canteens with vodka instead of water. I thought that was a clever trick. (We were required to carry two canteens and two ponchos.) I had packed a portable military hammock and it was really comfortable. I could sleep better knowing that the crawley bugs and rattlsnakes would be less of a nuiasance during the night.
------------------------------------------

The best of all sauces is hunger.
--Edward Abbey, Down the River
(Stories of Survival From The World's Most Dangerous Places)


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PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2004 1:46 pm 
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Has anyone else got any funny survival/bushcraft stories they are great to hear, :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed May 12, 2004 12:00 pm 
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There aren't too many deep woods folks here at quotations page. (At least that is my observation. )

I have drafted about 2 dozen stories based on my experiences in the outdoors. Four of the stories are approved for publication and I am still working on the rest. When I started the project in 2001 almost all the stories were about hunting. I was advised to diversify the collection. Since then I have been working on a number of stories that include canoeing, fishing, and other recreational pursuits.

Back in the winter of 1998 I was training for an extended hiking tour on the Appalachian Trail. My son and I went on an overnight backpacking trip to Mousetail Landing State Park. We had hiked to a trail shelter that was on a hill above the Tennessee River. The trail shelter included a cast iron stove for heating and cooking. The facility was also equipped with suspended bunk beds. The weather was seasonably cold but my son and I enjoyed a fellowship with the wilderness. We maintained a fire and cooked up some really good food.

During the night the temperature was about 20 degrees. We couldn't sleep because there was a rookery across the river that was full of ducks of all varieties( thousands of ducks). Those ducks quacked and chatttered all night long. At one point I started counting the seconds of silence between the quacks. The ducks would remain silent for no more than 7 seconds in one stretch. I finally got up at about 3:00 a.m. to build a fire and make coffee. I put my sleeping bag over my son to give him extra warmth. When daylight arrived I woke my son and told him that it was time for breakfast.

We arrived back in Lexington, Tennessee about 7:00 a.m. and stopped at the Huddle House for a second breakfast. We arrived home at Camp Juniper about 8:00 a.m. and had a third breakfast. I guess we had expended an enormous amount of calories in keeping warm. I went to bed and slept till it was time for the Superbowl to kickoff.

It was almost a week later before I learned the reason that the ducks were so vocal during the night. Ducks will roost on the water and they have to keep moving to keep the water from freezing. Otherwise, the water will freeze around the ducks and they will most likely not survive. The ducks take turnes swimming around to keep the ice from freezing and then they wake up other ducks to do the same.


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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2004 9:14 am 
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It was during the month of May during the year of 1997 when Rufus and I were backpacking along the lower loop of Fall Creek Falls. We had hiked about ten miles then descended the gorge and then hiked up out of the gorge. The weather was fair. We camped on the rim at a designated campsite. We had pitched two small tents then built a fire. We drank some vodka and lemonade and then boiled water to cook a Mountain House meal. The food was good and we had a relaxing evening of conversation in front of the camp fire.

The next morning we were hiking out to the trail head and I spotted something that appeared to be out of place. About 20 yards off the trail there was a white towell that was folded up and it was lying on top of stump. We walked over to the stump to examine the towell. It was a bit of a puzzle, an unsolved riddle. I looked at the towell then offered a hypothesis. "Stump Humpers," I said. Rufus looked at the towell then began scratching his chin. I could tell that he was in deep thought and I was anxious to hear his reply. "Stump Humpers," he said. We had a good horse laugh.

We could imagine a couple of young lovers who were utilizing a stump on the side of the trail to do their monkey business. RIGHT THERE ON THE TRAIL!
---------------

Hikers do it with their boots on. :D


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