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PostPosted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 3:48 pm 
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this is a question of great thought !!!.....discuss it n learn it !!

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 6:40 pm 
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A king may look like a king, and his fool may look like a fool, but it's the character within that matters.

Shakespeare lived in a time of royalty. It's clear his sympthaties are with the small people. Consider Romeo and Juliet. The kings and other high persons in his plays generally get slammed, which must have appealed to the "rabble" who stood close to the stage during his plays. It's like the recent television series Dynasty and Dallas. These rich prople had tons of problems, and the audience loved to see them suffer.

Shakespeare himself came out of an obscure background. He must have been aware of his genius as a writer. He was also aware that many of the great people of history similarly came out of nowhere. It seems that those who enherit high positions are rarely high-minded.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2006 8:45 am 
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Good explanation !!!!....Now explain how does this interact with the play THE TAMING OF THE SHREW.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 6:13 pm 
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Never read The Taming of the Shrew, but I saw the Richard Burton, Liz Taylor movie.

This play was a comedy, meaning it has a happy ending. It's not standup or slapstick comedy as we know it today, but Shakespeare's audience must have laughed at the antics of the players.

I don't think there's any room in a play like this for serious themes and I doubt Shakespeare intended any.

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 Post subject: Nice !!
PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2006 12:45 pm 
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Talking about a comedy ..... but shakespeare always leaves a serious message even in a coedy play......well thanx 4 commenting !!

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 Post subject: shakepeare's clowns
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:53 pm 
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A recent quote I read says it all; roughly paraphrased it says:
One can feign seriousness but cannot pretend to be witty.
In addition to this it is well known in comedic performance circles that;"It really does take brains to be funny".wlp


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 1:18 pm 
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I totally agree and I also think (not sure so tell me what you think about this) that the fool in Shakespeare's stories does not interact with the characters in a manner that would change the plot. I think the fool in his 'foolishness' is used to narrate something or pass on the message Shakespeare would have liked to say. In this way as the fool usually does not influence the plot Shakespeare succeeds in passing certain messages and none of the main character's personalities is thought to be any different by any statements they would have to make.

PS. In Greek we have a quote that translates as 'you usually learn the truth from children and foolish people' I think this is what happens with Shakespeare too as they readily tell the truth through their 'foolish' honesty.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 5:11 am 
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"PS. In Greek we have a quote that translates as 'you usually learn the truth from children and foolish people' "

Children are simple, meaning uncomplicated by contradictory emotions and opinions. They tell the simple truth as they see it

As we get older, we pick up all kinds of conflicting ideas and emotions from the trauma of living. We become complicated and evasive.

Shakespeare was working in London where competition was fierce, crime and poverty rampart, and his theatre constantly under the threat of being shut down because play actors were social pariahs at the time. I think once the royalty did shut down his theater. He must of longed for the simpliciity of childhood.


Also, in his political and historical plays, he had to be careful what he wrote. If he offended royalty he was finished. English kings had to made to look heroic, unless they were out of favor like Richard II. So he made the fool wiser than King Lear. That was his revenge. The crowds must have loved it.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 2:36 pm 
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Maybe it was to make a twisted contrast?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 5:28 am 
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joan_of_arc_friend wrote:
...Shakespeare lived in a time of royalty. It's clear his sympthaties are with the small people...


clear it's not

and like all normal people of that time he was a monarchist


Last edited by tzar on Tue Jan 23, 2007 2:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 2:14 pm 
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who read the book "tuesdays with morrie"

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:49 am 
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joan_of_arc_friend wrote:
I think once the royalty did shut down his theater.


I believe you're referring to when his plays couldn't be performed under Puritan religious rule. Either that or the time when The Rose (when Shakespeare was most likely only acting) was closed due to the plague. It was eventually shut down because the rent was too high.

joan_of_arc_friend wrote:
English kings had to made to look heroic, unless they were out of favor like Richard II. So he made the fool wiser than King Lear. That was his revenge. The crowds must have loved it.


Did you know Elizabeth is documented as saying 'I am Richard the II, know ye not that?' before executing the Earl of Essex, who used the play to stage a rebellion against her? She played a vital patron and commissioner of Shakespeare's work.

And surely you've not read/seen The Merry Wives of Windsor after that comment, because that's nothing but a taking the p--- out of Henry the VIII. There is no such documentation that claims Shakespeare as having to make the kings look heroic. The nature and structure of his plays certainly suggest the opposite.

It was obvious that his plays were so popular with the groundlings because of his attitude toward the monarchs and the wealthy. It's also conceived that there were mixed emotions toward characters like Richard III - wouldn't you have sympathy for a disabled locked away from the kingdom to see?

And Shakespeare distilled all of his plays. They may be based on true events, but should not be taken as facts. Even his comedies are based on former plays. He was quite a master at taking and revising ideas into rhetorical entertainment.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 3:46 pm 
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mbpowerhr wrote:
joan_of_arc_friend wrote:
I think once the royalty did shut down his theater.


I believe you're referring to when his plays couldn't be performed under Puritan religious rule. Either that or the time when The Rose (when Shakespeare was most likely only acting) was closed due to the plague. It was eventually shut down because the rent was too high.



or possiblythe time the globe theatre burned down, or the time it was disassembled, moved on barged across the river in pieces, then reassembled on the other side.

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