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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2006 3:37 pm 
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Well, let's see...for classics, read The Picture of Dorian Gray, Silas Marner,
A Farewell To Arms, Adam Bede, David Copperfield, Great Expectations.

For Horror, Bentley Little's The Mailman, Stephen King's The Stand.

Mystery, read anything by James Lee Burke, or read something by
Agatha Christie.

Read something by an author named Taylor Caldwell. Or try Anya Seton.
Her book about the early colonies, The Winthrop Woman is wonderful.

That's all I can thinkof for now, but there are so many!


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 Post subject: Worth the paper
PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:23 am 
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One of the Greatest book I've ever read was "The Complete Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy" by Douglas Adams. It will have you in stitches from beginning to end. 10 out of 10 in my book.
The Movie was pretty close to the book, but as with most translations, certain specific and important aspects are edited or changed from the movies. Plus the movie only showed the first installment of the whole story.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:03 am 
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Hitch hikers was good. THe radio series was better than the books though. Not sure how you can say the film was anything like the books though.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 4:40 pm 
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I also think everyone should read C.S. Lewis' series, the lion, the witch and the wardrobe and also the anne of green gables books. These have got to be some of my favorites.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:05 am 
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You could read "After Death", its not yet written but in the process.. Working hard on it.. its all about life after death... FULLLL STOPPP... that was only the inside preview.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 6:01 pm 
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"Joan of Arc by Herself and her Witnesses", by Regine Pernoud.

There have been tens of thousands of biographies written about Joan, but Pernoud was a serious French historian who wrote a very detailed and historically accurate account of this amazing teenager.

There are lots of books about lots of subjects, but Joan's story is unique. Is what we're reading really about the first Divine intervention into human affairs since Biblical times?

Pernoud does not claim such. She does admit there are many details in Joan's story that cannot be explained according to "our present scientific knowledge". She says it may be centuries before we can understand these things.

Well, I think I know the answers already, but you be the judge.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:09 pm 
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if ur into movies that are horrors and thrillers the books u must read are by karin slaughter i picked one up one day for something new to read and got hooked on the set- they all set in a town in america so have the same characters and so u become invested into the story from previous books it mainly revolves around the police chief- jeoffrey toiller and the paedritican/morticain- and each book has very... intense storylines some pretty gruseome things that at the movies well u kno- the gf would jump and in real life it would make you sick- certainly puts a perspective on ones life
LA X


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:49 pm 
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Sorry Guys...couldn't read all of that. But here are my top twenty or more.

1. "Green Rider" by: Kristen Britain

2. "First Riders Call" by: Kriten Britain

3. "Inkheart" by: Cornelia Funke

4. "Inkspell" by: Cornelia Funke

5. "Twilight" by: Stephenie Meyer

6. "Eragon" by: Christopher Paolini

7. "Eldest" by: Christopher Paolini

8. "The Wheel of Time Series" by: Robert Jordan
Which includes:
8.New Spring,
9.The Eye of the World,
10.The Great Hunt,
11.The Dragon Reborn,
12.The Shadow Rising,
13.The Fires of Heaven,
14.Lord of Chaos,
15.A Crown of Swords,
16.The Path of Daggers,
17.Winter's Heart,
18.Crossroads of Twilight,
19.Knife of Dreams,
20.A Memory of Light.

Thats 20 Books

21. I recommend this book above all. "The Way of the Peacful Warrior" by: Dan Millman

22. "Journey of the Peaceful Warrior" by: Dan Millman

23. "The Stand" by: Stephen King

24. Harry Potter and the Sorcerors Stone by: J.K Rowling

25. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

26. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban(sp?)

27. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

28. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

29. Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince

30. Subterrainean by: James Rollins

31. Excavation by: James Rollins

32. Deep Fathom by: James Rollins

33. Amazonia by: James Rollins

34. Ice Hunt by: James Rollins

35,36,37. The Anasazi Mysteries by: Kathleen O'Neal Gear, W. Michael Gear

38. Great Expectations by: Charles Dickens

I have exhausted my brain here. I'm done for now unless I remember more.

Raven

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2006 7:14 am 
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i don't read books at all, but i make a xception for qoute's. never have i seen ppl read so much books. I am ashamed. hahaha! i am also just into movies. Narnia was xcellent and of course passion of the christ.

8O


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 8:20 pm 
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my favorite books that i think anyone should read are.....

the count of monte cristo by alexandre dumas....definitely the unabridged one

the three musketeers also by alexandre dumas

the wheel of time series

the outsiders cant remember who its by

to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

and the iliad by homer


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2006 11:09 am 
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I made this list of 100 for a girl I like and I to read- note it has a strong classical slant:

100 Books to read:

Aeschylus- Tragedies
Alighieri, Dante- The Divine Comedy
Austen, Jane- Emma
Austen, Jane- Pride and Prejudice
Bellow, Saul- Seize the Day
Borges, Jorge Luis- Labyrinths
Bradbury, Ray- Dandelion Wine
Brittain, Vera- Testament to Youth
Bronte, Charlotte- Jane Eyre
Bronte, Emily- Wuthering Heights
Burgess, Anthony, A Clockwork Orange
Burroughs, William S.- The Naked Lunch
Camus, Albert- The Stranger
Capote, Truman- Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Cervantes, Miguel de- Don Quixote
Chandler, Raymond- The Big Sleep
Collins, Wilkie- The Woman in White
Conrad, Joseph- Heart of Darkness
Conrad, Joseph- Nostromo
Defoe, Daniel- Robinson Crusoe
DeLillo, Don- White Noise
Dickens, Charles- A Tale of Two Cities
Dickens, Charles- Great Expectations
Dostoevsky, Fyodor- Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky, Fyodor- The Brothers Kazamarov
Dreiser, Theodore- An American Tragedy
Dumas, Alexandre- The Black Tulip
Dumas, Alexandre- The Count of Monte Cristo
Eco, Umberto- The Name of the Rose
Eliot, George- Middlemarch
Eugenides, Jeffrey- Middlesex
Faulkner, William- As I Lay Dying
Faulkner, William, The Sound and the Fury
Fitzgerald, F Scott, Tender is the Night
Fitzgerald, F Scott- The Great Gatsby
Flaubert, Gustave- Madame Bovary
Forster, E..M.- A Room with a View
Fowles, John- The French Lieutenant’s Woman
Frank, Anne- The Diary of Anne Frank
Graves, Robert- I, Claudius
Hardy, Thomas- Far From the Madding Crowd
Hardy, Thomas- Tess of the D’Urbervilles
Hawthorne, Nathaniel- The Scarlet Letter
Heller, Joseph, Catch-22
Hemingway, Ernest- For Whom the Bell Tolls
Hemingway, Ernest- The Old Man and the Sea
Hemingway, Ernest- The Sun Also Rises
Homer, The Iliad
Hugo, Victor- Les Miserables
Hugo, Victor- Notre Dame de Paris
Huxley, Aldous- Brave New World
Huxley, Aldous- Eyeless in Gaza
Joyce, James- Ulysses
Kafka, Franz- The Trial
Kerouac, Jack- On The Road
Knowles, John- A Separate Peace
Kundera, Milan- The Unbearable Lightness of Being
Laclos, Pierre Choderlos De- Dangerous Liaisons
Lawrence, DH- Sons and Lovers
Lee, Harper- To Kill a Mockingbird
Lermontov, Mikhail- A Hero of Our Time
Leroux, Gaston- The Phantom of the Opera
Machiavelli, Niccolo- The Prince
Marlowe, Christopher- Dr. Faustus
Marquez, Gabriel Garcia- Love in the Time of Cholera
Marquez, Gabriel Garcia- One Hundred Years of Solitude
McEwan, Ian- The Cement Garden
Miller, Arthur- The Crucible
Miller, Henry- Tropic of Cancer
Milton, John- Paradise Lost
Morrison, Toni- Beloved
Murdoch, Iris- The Black Prince
Murdoch, Iris- Under the Net
Nabakov, Vladimir- Pale Fire
Ondaatje, Michael- The English Patient
Orwell, George- 1984
Orwell, George- Animal Farm
Pasternak, Boris- Dr. Zhivago
Proust, Marcel- In Search of Lost Time
Remarque, Erich Maria- All Quiet on the Western Front
Salinger, JD- Catcher in the Rye
Sartre, Jean-Paul- Nausea
Sartre, Jean-Paul- No Exit
Sophocles- Tragedies
Steinbeck, John- Of Mice and Men
Steinbeck, John- The Grapes of Wrath
Suskind, Patrick- Perfume
Tartt, Donna- The Secret History
Thackeray, William- Vanity Fair
Tolstoy, Leo- Anna Karenina
Tolstoy, Leo- War and Peace
Virgil- The Aeneid
Vonnegut, Kurt- Slaughterhouse Five
Walker, Alice- The Colour Purple
Waugh, Evelyn- Brideshead Revisited
Wilde, Oscar- The Picture of Dorian Grey
Wolfe, Tom- The Bonfire of the Vanities
Woolf, Virginia, Mrs Dalloway
Woolf, Virginia- To The Lighthouse
Woolf, Virginia- The Waves

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 7:25 pm 
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Well this isn't 20, but I saw you liked thrillers and horrors so I just had to tell you...Ted Dekker is an awesome writer! I read "Blink" in a matter of 2 days. Each page almost turned itself I was so into it!


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 4:56 pm 
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I'm not going to list 20 because frankly most of my list would be comprised of titles that have been mentioned several times already. Suffice it to say that anything by Pratchett, most things by Tolkien, Wheel of Time, Hitchhiker's, etc. I've always been a believer that redundancy is to be avoided.

I'm not going to list 20 because frankly most of my list would be comprised of titles that have been mentioned several times already. Suffice it to say that anything by Pratchett, most things by Tolkien, Wheel of Time, Hitchhiker's, etc. I've always been a believer that redundancy is to be avoided.

[sorry, I couldn't resist]

Ones that I have not seen mentioned here, or not mentioned frequently enough (in no particular order):

"The Once and Future King" by T.H. White
"Lord of the Flies" by William Golding
"A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch" by Alexander Solzhenitsyn
"The Prince" by Niccolo Machiavelli
"1984" by George Orwell
"Animal Farm" by George Orwell
"Brave New World Revisited" by Aldous Huxley

Making me want to break these all back out again right now.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 6:08 pm 
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I'm not sure how many I'm going to list as I'm doing this off the top of my head but:

1. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco - A mystery set in a medievel monestery

2. The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing - The most fascinating work about how life affects our mind and our thoughts shape our life.

3. The Penelopiad by Margret Atwood - It's a rather humourous look at the Odyssey through the eyes of Penelope, Odysess' wife.

4. The Cantebury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer - A collection of tales with something for everyone, from romantic to raunchy.

5. Fifth Business by Robertson Davies - How a single childhood incident forever changes the lives of three men. And while your at it, the other two books in the Deptford Trilogy...

6. The Manticore

7. World of Wonders

8. The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux - the book that started it all!

9. An Adoration by Nancy Huston - a trial is unfolding about the life and death of a man and You, the reader, are the judge. As witnesses present wildly different testimonies it makes you ask if anyone ever really knows anyone else.

10. Leave to Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse - a humour classic!

11. The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope - a perfect satire. If you're not a fan of Victorian writing forget Dickens and read Trollope. He stripped away all Victorian pretentions and showed life as it truly was.

12. A Son of the Circus by John Irving - one of his lesser known but more brilliant novels.

13. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez - the birth, life and death of a town as seen through the eyes of it's founding family.

14. Confessions of an English Opium Eater by Thomas DeQuincey - the article that helped convince British parliment to outlaw opium.

15. The Loved and the Lost by Morley Callaghan - about a woman effortlessly crosses the boundries between the rich, poor, black and white in 1950's Montreal and the hatred she faces because of it.

That's all I can think of right now. I'll be back later if I can think of some more.

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