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 Post subject: war poetry
PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 11:53 pm 
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i was wondering how many of you have stuided with any serious depth the poetry of the first world war. i myself have studied the works of siegfried sassoon for a fair while and have often wondered how many people do it. i know that many encounter problems with this rather dark mode of poetry but it also has a certain sweetness within it and some of the verse is prophetic, just take a look at the poem "aftermath".

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2006 12:56 am 
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Re: Aftermath - excellant heartfelt poem

excerpt from
http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/8103/
"The war was hard on Siegfried and his family. Early in the war Sassoon's brother Hamo was mortally wounded at Gallipoli. Hamo was later buried at sea. Siegfried took vengence for his brother's death by involving himself in brave, sometimes suicidal deeds against the Germans. A short leave from the front helped to calm him and later as the war dragged on, he experienced a sense of total disgust with the conflict. This distain would work its way into his poetry. During a spell of convalescence in which he was treated for shell shock at Craiglockhart Hospital in Edinburgh, Scotland he met and befriended the poet, Wilfred Owen who was being treated for the same ailment"

Which is a lead up to a great poem by Wilfred Owen
Dulce et Decorum Est
http://www.illyria.com/owenpro.html

Excerpt from the following website.
http://users.fulladsl.be/spb1667/cultural/owen.html
In August 1918, after his friend, the other great War Poet, Siegfried Sassoon, had been severely injured and sent back to England, Owen returned to France. War was still as horrid as before. The butchery was ended on 11th November 1918 at 11 o'clock. Seven days before Owen had been killed in one of the last vain battles of this war.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2006 10:36 am 
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ah yes, dulce et decorum est. that's the most obvious war poem. i did that in history while we were studying the first world war. i like it

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 9:36 am 
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so i am not alone as reader of this most powerful work. indeed i would say owen was right when he proclaimed the old saying a lie for how can it ever be sweet and glorious to die for a country that would never acknowledge you only the commander who caused your death. indeed the poems "does it matter" and "suicide in the trenches" also seems to target those who thought the war a glorious thing. you can often see where owens poetry was inspired by his mentor

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 6:28 pm 
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EWR.. could you translate those latin phrases? I studied Latin many years ago, but I forgot most of what I learned.

Sassoon's and Owen's war poetry is so much better than any modern poetry that I have ever seen on this topic.

Here's a poem by Ogdan Nash. I am not certain what the meaning is. I am thinking that he is positing some post-war scenario. Much lighter in spirit than anything by Sassoon and Owen!


Exit, Pursued by a Bear

Chipmunk chewing on the Chippendale,
Mice on the Meissen shelf,
Pigeon stains on the Aubusson,
Spider lace on the delf.

Squirrel climbing on the Sheraton,
Skunk on the Duncan Phyfe,
Silverfish in the Gobelins
And the calfbound volumes of Life

Pocks on the pink Picasso,
Dust on the four Cezannes,
Kit on the keys of the Steinway,
Cat on the Louis Quinze.

Rings on the Adam mantel,
From a thousand bygone thirsts,
Mold on the Henry Millers,
And the Ronald Firbank firsts.

The lion and the lizard
No heavenly harmonies hear
From the high-fidelity speaker
Concealed behind the Vermeer.

Jamshid squats in a cavern
Screened by a waterfall,
Catered by Heinz and Campbell,
And awaits the fireball.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2006 12:26 am 
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the latin phrase say to different things the first is "i dont think antone knows i love the girl; i havnt done anything really silly yet" and the second is "dont upset my calculations" yes you will notice within the works of owen and sassoon a certain bitterness. owens work itself only became really notable after his time with sassoon in 1917 and by that time the gay young officer that had written such poems as "the kiss" was rather bitter towards it all remember he wrote his declaration before he got looked up. the darkness in theier writings is a far cry from some of the other works of wartime poets as even within the poem "in flanders fields" you can still see some patriotic sentiment while sassoon was by that time only fighting for the men he fought beside. according to some sources owen didnt feel as bitter as the poems he wrote would suggest. another notable poet of the war was robert greaves i can still remember the effect his poem "david and goliath" had on me when i first read it. remember the patriotic poets such as rupert brooke and his poem the soldier
The Soldier
If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.
And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

that is the sort of poem im sure the goverments would like to see remembered but through their bitterness owen and sassoon shaped the idea of what war was.

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Non vereor ne illam me amare hic potuerit resciscere; quippe haud etiam quicquam inepte feci

Noli turbare circulos meos!

"Gravity cannot be held responsible for people falling in love."


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2006 8:19 am 
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i found this song one day on the history channal. it was on a speashal about WWI pilots. they had verry low life expetencys, but lived in relitive comfort, making for a rather cynical, resined veiw on the world. while this isn't exataly a poam, i find it helps you get in there frame of mind

We meet ‘neath the sounding rafters,
The wall all around us are bare;
They echo the peals of laufter;
It seems the dead are there.

So, stand by your glasses steady,
This world is a world of lies.
Here’s a toast to the dead already;
Hurrah for the next man who dies.

Cut off from the land that bore us,
Betayed by the land we find,
The good men have gone before us
Only the dull left behind

So, stand by your glasses steady,
This world is a world of lies.
Then here’s to the dead already;
And hurrah for the next man who dies.

-Lafayette Escadrille
American Ace stationed in London
WWI

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 1:14 pm 
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Here's a war song from a Brit's point of view.. Re: In response to the news of 100 British dead.
http://www.everking.talktalk.net/soldiers128kbps.mp3

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:07 pm 
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Here's another war protest song
http://www.grafyte.deneo.co.uk/deepest/

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