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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2005 7:21 am 
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Any suggestions on poets, titles, styles that would have a chance of appealing to my students? I teach 9th and 10th graders.

HELP!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2005 1:43 pm 
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Try Mary Oliver or the Beats.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:34 am 
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which levels of your students?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 4:31 am 
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If you want to get a good discussion going, talk about women's and men's poetry. Have the students find constructive examples.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 7:14 am 
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i dont think poetries have any gender.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:27 pm 
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I think he meant poetry written by men/women.

I might be wrong, though :?:

che

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:02 pm 
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Im English, who wants to tell me what age group that is?
x

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 4:48 am 
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Hi purplelettuce! :D (and Paul14227)

9th and 10th graders are in the age range of about 13-17 - it depends on where you are! But generally it's about 14-16. The 13 and 17 year olds are exceptions - although you do have them!! :D

But in reply to the topic, we've recently done "Dulce et Decorum est" by Wilfred Owen. It's a war poem so they might not like it, but it's really good and pretty simple to understand and study!! :D Hope this has helped!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:22 am 
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OK im 17, last year of school before uni . (in England, its sixth form and i'm in upper sixth) (thanks for telling me ages)
anyway, im really enjoying chaucer, beause the stories are so interesting, but thats a bit hard to manage for 13 years. ummmm.
Ah i know! the most popular poetry we studied was, and still is, from the AQA exam board GCSE English anthology. theres a list of them on their website. It was poems from different cultures.
poems like 'Limbo'. hang on, I'll go on the website:
Edward Kamau Brathwaite: Limbo
Grace Nichols: Island Man
Tatamkhulu Afrika: Nothing's Changed
Imtiaz Dharker: Blessing
Lawrence Ferlinghetti: Two Scavengers...
Nissim Ezekiel: Night of the Scorpion
Chinua Achebe: Vultures
Denise Levertov: What Were They Like?
Sujata Bhatt: from Search For My Tongue
Tom Leonard: from Unrelated Incidents
John Agard: Half-Caste
Derek Walcott: Love After Love Imtiaz Dharker: This Room
Niyi Osundare: Not My Business
Moniza Alvi: Presents from my Aunts...
Grace Nichols: Hurricane Hits England
(the blue ones are my favourites)
ahhh shucks i loved these poems, im gunna post one. bcus i really enjoyed studying them :)

You ask me what I mean
by saying I have lost my tongue.
I ask you, what would you do
if you had two tongues in your mouth,
and lost the first one, the mother tongue,
and could not really know the other,
the foreign tongue.
You could not use them both together
even if you thought that way.
And if you lived in a place you had to
speak a foreign tongue,
your mother tongue would rot,
rot and die in your mouth
until you had to spit it out.
I thought I spit it out
but overnight while I dream,

(munay hutoo kay aakhee jeebh aakhee bhasha)
(may thoonky nakhi chay)
(parantoo rattray svupnama mari bhasha pachi aavay chay)
(foolnee jaim mari bhasha mari jeebh)
(modhama kheelay chay)
(fullnee jaim mari bhasha mari jeebh)
(modhama pakay chay)

it grows back, a stump of a shoot
grows longer, grows moist, grows strong veins,
it ties the other tongue in knots,
the bud opens, the bud opens in my mouth,
it pushes the other tongue aside.
Everytime I think I’ve forgotten,
I think I’ve lost the mother tongue,
it blossoms out of my mouth.

The middle bits Gujerati ( sorry probably sp) I'll have a hunt on the web and find out what it means
xx

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 11:02 am 
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The Sceptic
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What you planning on studying at uni? Where are you planning on studying. I appreaciate you may not have made your mind up on the later. How is your UCAS stuff going?
I suppose IF and the Two roads Diverged poems not sure of the author of either or the proper name of the later.
[IF]

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you
But make allowance for their doubting too,
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise:
If you can dream--and not make dreams your master,
If you can think--and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools:
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it all on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!"
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings--nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much,
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And--which is more--you'll be a Man, my son!

====================================
TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveller, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--
I took the one less travelled by,
And that has made all the difference
=================
I also find it intresting to compare national athems. Not the first verses though cos they are dull e.g. The UK national athemn.

British Words
1. God save our gracious Queen,
Long live our noble Queen,
God save the Queen!
Send her victorious,
Happy and glorious,
Long to reign over us;
God save the Queen!

2. O Lord our God arise,
Scatter her enemies
And make them fall;
Confound their politics,
Frustrate their knavish tricks,
On Thee our hopes we fix,
God save us all!

3. Thy choicest gifts in store
On her be pleased to pour;
Long may she reign;
May she defend our laws,
And ever give us cause
To sing with heart and voice,
God save the Queen!

4. Not in this land alone,
But be God's mercies known,
From shore to shore!
Lord make the nations see,
That men should brothers be,
And form one family,
The wide world over.

5. From every latent foe,
From the assassins blow,
God save the Queen!
O'er her thine arm extend,
For Britain's sake defend,
Our mother, prince, and friend,
God save the Queen!

6. Lord grant that Marshal Wade
May by thy mighty aid
Victory bring.
May he sedition hush,
And like a torrent rush,
Rebellious Scots to crush.
God save the Queen!

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 11:43 am 
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English! lang and lit. umm Brum, sheffield, Cradiff, bristoil or notts. and ive sent it, ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! :)

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:45 pm 
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alex348 wrote:
But in reply to the topic, we've recently done "Dulce et Decorum est" by Wilfred Owen. It's a war poem so they might not like it, but it's really good and pretty simple to understand and study


Oh I dunno, I liked Dulce est decorum est when I was in grade seven, and I'm in grade eight now. We did it as part of a Remembrance Day project. It's not quite as famous as In Flander's Fields, but still...

Branching off to In Flander's Fields, I loved the symbolism of the poppies there. Apparently, poppies grow at war sites because of the great limestone deposits (I think it's limestone), so some fields look completely red after a war. The red then fades when the limestone has been used up. How appropriate... That little fact made me appreciate it a lot more.

Sonnets are interesting too. Much of the problem, I think, with getting kids to like poetry, is teaching them to write it. So, enter the sonnets. They give a kind of outline for the poem, without really limiting them. I recommend a Petrachan (Italian) sonnet.

I'd say for grade nines, who tend to have something of an apprehension when it comes to poetry, maybe it would be more effective to show some poetry written by someone their age. No author readily comes to mind, but I could send some of mine if you like. It's nothing spectacular, but its at least useable.

Show them there are examples of poetry throughout the world around us, the most prominent example being in music. This might have an effect.

What my teacher did was show us some sonnets that might help us impress a girl. (I go to a boys school). This was said somewhat jokingly, but there was some truth in it.

But hey, it's your call. That's just what I think on the matter.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:55 pm 
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The Sceptic
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@Purplelettuce aren't you allowed 6 choices. Not that it really matters. Of those the only one I applied to is Cardiff and never seriously entertained going there. THen again the prioritities are a little diffrent for chosing physics or English, that said the English course here (York Uni.) seems to be intresting from what I have heard.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 11:27 pm 
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I'm in Grade 10 and we all loved Dulce et Decorum est!! :D (by the way purplelettuce, grades 9 and 10 are forms 3 and 4 in the british system - why didn't you say??? :D I used to go to a school that ran on the British system...we were mostly 14/15 with a few 16 yr olds in form 4 but here in SA most people are 16 in grade 10...)

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What my teacher did was show us some sonnets that might help us impress a girl. (I go to a boys school). This was said somewhat jokingly, but there was some truth in it.


Your teacher knew what he was doing Airball!! :D Not all girls will like it, but the more romantic ones will certainly appreciate them (I'm a die-hard fan of flowers, sonnets etc...call me old-fashioned and soppy! :wink: :lol: ) My personal favourite is Shakesperare's most famous "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate..." That man was a genius! :D

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:09 am 
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Yeh, i applied twice to Brum. two different courses. the 2nd is kind of my back up- English in education. And the York one is great! includes a lot of drma :0 but it dint quite get in 2my shortlist.
ahhhhh Shakespeare.....
*starts chanting in head: give me an S give me a H give me a A give me a K....... SHAKESPEARE!*
xx

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