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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:16 am 
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I'm very new here and I just really want to know what books I should read from people who actually read them rather than random impersonal lists online.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 3:25 pm 
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only the ones you want to read.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 12:12 pm 
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only the good ones.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 2:48 pm 
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You need to specify some sort of criteria, a category of some sort. Your request is impossible to respond to, all you will get is a list of everyone's favorites, which you've stated you don't want.
I can look to my left from where I am sitting and see my "library" and here are some titles I would consider "must reads"
The Return of the Native - Hardy
Oliver Twist - Dickens
The Sea-Wolf - London
The Picture of Dorian Gray - Wilde
Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde - Stevenson
Dune - Herbert
Childhoods End - Clark

Better stop. See what I mean? This is just some of my favorites really. A lot of people would look at this list and go "huh?" So, really the best thing to do is read as much as you can and try not to restrict yourself to one area.
Quote:
"The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them."
-Mark Twain
"Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them all".
~Henry David Thoreau
"Only two classes of books are of universal appeal. The very best and the very worst."
-Ford Maddox
"What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books."
-Thomas Carlyle
Memory is the receptacle and case of science: and therefore mine being so treacherous, if I know little, I cannot much complain. I know, in general, the names of the arts, and of what they treat, but nothing more. I turn over books; I do not study them. What I retain I no longer recognise as another's; 'tis only what my judgment has made its advantage of, the discourses and imaginations in which it has been instructed: the author, place, words, and other circumstances, I immediately forget; and I am so excellent at forgetting, that I no less forget my own writings and compositions than the rest. I am very often quoted to myself, and am not aware of it. Whoever should inquire of me where I had the verses and examples, that I have here huddled together, would puzzle me to tell him, and yet I have not borrowed them but from famous and known authors, not contenting myself that they were rich, if I, moreover, had them not from rich and honourable hands, where there is a concurrence of authority with reason. It is no great wonder if my book run the same fortune that other books do, if my memory lose what I have written as well as what I have read, and what I give, as well as what I receive.
-Michel de Montaigne
An ordinary man can surround himself with two thousand books and thenceforward have at least one place in the world in which it is possible to be happy.
-Augustine Birrell


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2005 8:08 pm 
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[color=darkred]Think of all the famously intelligent people that you admire. Then find their books on the internet. They'll most likely be good books, but may be beyond your comprehension. Choose whichever you like.[/color]


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2005 12:49 pm 
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Good choice: :arrow: The Picture of Dorian Gray - Wilde
Again what do you like?
But
ummm
I'd suggest one of Wilde's plays over 'Picture...' so um 'The importance of Being Earnest'
'Frankenstein' is a good one.
A Shakespeare, possibly 'Othello'
For lighter reading, A James Patterson, probably a fantasy one, 'The Lake House'
'Shadows'- Tim Bowler.
tell us what you want and we'll be able to tell you better....
:)
xx

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2005 1:07 pm 
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I just thought, The Magus, John Fowles. complex byut brilliant
and The solitare mystery- jostein something beginning with G....

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 2:15 pm 
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Thanks for all your replies so far. To narrow the search a bit- I want to read the sort of books people refer to all the time, that have some sort of relevance. I have looked online at certain 'must read' book lists and there are the obvious classics there such as Shakespear, Dickens, Oscar Wilde and Austen but I still feel there are so many books that this can't just be it on all the lists so I was wondering what actual readers thought?


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 3:27 am 
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hmm try reading for Paulo Coelho..
Quote:
jostein something beginning with G....

hehe that's Jostein Gaarder, his book The Orange Girl might be a good read too

Rana

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:46 pm 
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Mariantionette wrote:
Reading, apart from when one has to read certain books for academic reasons, is very much a personal thing. What is a good book to you, may not even get on the bestseller lists or book of the year. Similarly, what is a good book to you, may be cannon fodder for another individual.



"academic reasons" -> it is impossible to read all theory books in a few years but different teachers can juge you if you dont read/or postpone to read the kind of books that you think they are not "academical" and contains subjective opinions, such as etnocentric books. well, do not panic. just fighting enough.

"the bestseller lists or book of the year" -> true. who must decide for me what is best for me ?! noise noise noise...


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 9:30 pm 
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Some of my favorites...various genres...

A Handmaid's Tale (can't recall the author)

Good Omens (a hilarious satire by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett)

The Great Gatsby (by F. Scott Fitzgerald)

Fermat's Enigma (by Singh?...non-fiction...neat stories, particularly if you have any interest in mathematics)

Native Son (by Wright)

And I must agree with the aforementioned The Little Prince and The Alchemist (I cried during both), and Catcher in the Rye.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2005 2:49 am 
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Um....

Animal Farm by George Orwell- simple but makes you think

Lord of the Flies by William Golding - cruel story but considered by many to be one of the best novels ever wriiten

From Shakespeare...my favourite is Hamlet

If you're interested in any genetic stuff then Bryan Sykes' "Adam's Curse" and "The seven daughters of Eve" are good.

Bill Bryson's "A short history of nearly everything" is really good too! :D


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2005 11:31 pm 
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I recomended this book to almost everyone. It changed my life in so many ways that I felt I needed to share it. Still do!

"The Way of the Peaceful Warrior", by Dan Millman

A Quote:
“You haven't yet opened your heart fully, to life, to each moment. The peaceful warrior's way is not about invulnerability, but absolute vulnerability--to the world, to life, and to the Presence you felt. All along I've shown you by example that a warrior's life is not about imagined perfection or victory; it is about love. Love is a warrior's sword; wherever it cuts, it gives life, not death.”
~Dan Millman

I am a fantasy reader, so that book above was out of the ordinary for me. For a good series, I recomend "The wheel of Time" by Robert Jordan

Raven

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:00 pm 
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Hello EasyG:
There are so many terrific books. I'm a terrible person to take advice from because I never stick to one subject or writer. Read everything is all I can say. Spend some time in your local library, walk around and just handle the books. You'll find something that will spark your interest. I often find that writers make lots of reading recommendations in their work. Keep a list of the books other writers recommend or mention and check them out.
I have a couple of good books I enjoyed and remember daily even though I read them years ago. The Grapes Of Wrath By John Steinbeck, The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho and The Man Who Listens to Horses By Monty Roberts.

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