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 Post subject: Siddhartha
PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2005 12:34 pm 
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I recently read Herman Hesse's Siddhartha and I'm hoping to spark some discussion about it. I've seen a few people reccomend it as a great read and I can't say that I agree with them on that. Perhaps it's just a difference of opinion, but I'm wondering if I misinterpreted the story. I hope that those who have read it will start up a discussion and try to help me understand the story better, otherwise my reading was in vain.

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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 7:49 pm 
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While i personoly don't agree with the philosophy of it is interesting. I read it right after reading Ayn Rand so the contrast really made it different. It is very religious. It talks about sacrafice of everythign a lot. It has the "want nothing and recieve all you want" attitude that I see as a "never want, never get, never live". I would just like to know why didn't you like it and if anything, what did you like about it.


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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2005 11:04 am 
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First off, thank you so much Cervantez for responding, I didn't think anyone was going to.

I guess what I didn't like about Siddhartha was that I found the whole story to be a bit insipid. It didn't really grab my attention, and I thought that perhaps that was because I didn't fully understand it.
I do think it had a good message if looked at through a lenient perspective. I found the message to be about simplicity of human nature, and while I myself do not practice or believe in Buddism, I thought that core of the message was something that people could relate to universally.
I think what I found most inscrutable about the novel was the end, when Govinda kissed Siddhartha's forehead and saw all that he saw. I don't really understand what that represents, and I think not understanding the end of the novel made the novel as whole seem obfuscatory. That's why I was hoping someone who did understand it could help see what I missed.

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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2005 12:59 pm 
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Literature, with every other form of art, should be what you interpet it to be. The author or artist could be meaning one thing but the way you think of it is what is important. If all of it means nothing to you than someone explaining it to you will have no relevence. Personally, the part I liked was that you can not live as others want you to. What I mean by this is that your must find out for your own, which applies in this sense(interpet it on your own in your case). Siddartha must live his own life and interpet his own sense of right and wrong. People can teach you something but it never has the same meaning when the person who is teaching you is yourself. I hope this helps some.


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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2005 3:19 pm 
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Wow. You really opened a window for me. Thank you so much. :-)

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