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PostPosted: Wed Oct 13, 2004 10:38 am 
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and am struggling to get through Ulysses by James Joyce right now

Someone else is doing that too! I wanted to read that book since our English teacher handed out one of these "Top 100 Novels" which had Ulysses ranked as no 1 but never got round to actually getting my hands ona copy. Last Chritmas, then, when I had some extra cash I went looking for it but found to my surprise that there was not a sinlge copy in the entire country, if not in some used books store. Not in English, Finnish, or Swedish! So I forgot about the book again for a while, I had about three books going on at any given time so I hope I'll be forgiven for that. So finally, I went to Barcelona in August before school started and by accident arrived at this market hall and from the upstairs store I found a copy of Ulysses, the annotated (which makes reading a lot easier, though still not easy) 1922 text! I find that quite random, to buy Ulysses from the upstairs of a Barcelona fish market!

Anyway, other than that I'm reading Paradise Lost, How to Read and Why by Harold Bloom, a book by the Finnish author F. E. Sillanpää, and Scarlet Letter which I just bought today.

ophelia wrote:
Right now, I have begun George Orwell's 1984. It is starting off slowly, but I hope it gets better. Any comments on it are appreciated. Thanks!

I really liked that book, in a quite weird way. The beginning is a bit tedious, granted, but once you reach the end you'll be so shocked it'll be worth it. For me at least the ending made up for any possible flaws with the book. It was never downright boring in my opinion but let's just say that there are thickher books out there I've finished faster.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2004 2:16 pm 
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:) A very gritty thriller by
Jenny Siler, "Iced". It's a
paperback that I picked up
in the library, just out of
curiosity. If her others are
this good, I'll read them too.
A fast-paced novel.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 06, 2004 12:37 am 
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hey i am new here too....
i just started reading
"a tear and a smile"~ Gibran Khalil Gibran (he is amazing)


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 12:48 am 
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In keeping with the spirit of Halloween, and the books I was able to find in Hong Kong, I have just finished reading: The Invisible Man, War of the Worlds (Wells is a long-time favorite but someone stole my collection of Wells and Jules Verne SF books and they are hard to replace in China) The Strange Case of Dr Jeckly and Mr Hyde, and Lord of the Flies. Anyone else out there really enjoy 19th century horror/SF?

I also recently finished rereading Tale of two Cities and Les Miserables. Good companion masterpieces dealing with nearly the same time period. Two lesser works for anyone interested in the Napoleonic Wars/French Revolution/Terror/Restoration era are The Count of Monte Cristo and The Scarlet Pimpernel. Dickens and Hugo are the masters when it comes to needless human suffering at the hands of Man.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 2:22 pm 
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Talon of the Silver Hawk,
the first in a series
by Raymond Feist. An
excellent read, if
you like fantasy, and
I really do!
:wink: :)


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2004 3:21 pm 
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Suzanne- I've heard of Raymond Feist but never read any of his novels, have you read anything by Gemmell, Jordan, Brooks or Eddings? if so how do they compare?

Joseph- Sounds like an interesting collection. I've been meaning to get some work by Wells and Verne. I studied Lord of the Flies two years ago and enjoyed it thoroughly, if you ever get the chance to see either of the video versions, jump at the opportunity, one of them is a good rendition but the other is hilarious. I recently finished Les Miserables and absolutely loved it and have just started The Count of Monte Cristo. Do you much like Dickens? A certain lady on this website has urged me to read him in the past, but I've never been especially persuaded...

Nadabi- I've never read Joyce, but from what I know of his style, the ambiguity and naturalism doesn't appeal to me, I think Ulysses, though please contest this with me if you think I'm wrong, has always had a snobby following, especially due to the jargon; in a word it is subscribed over-importance because intellectuals have consistently referred to its nature. I'd love to read Paradise Lost, but I always seem to get caught up with people offering me new things to 'try.'

Perfectionist16- I'm so glad to see you're really enjoying the saga, just wait until the end of the ninth book...

Jonosss- I suggest reading Dan Brown with a critical mind. Especially when reading The Da Vinci Code, consider to what extent Brown invites the reader from his preface to accept his fictional plot, as any one who has read 'Enduring Love' by Ian McEwan will know, authors sometimes take great delight in fooling their audiences where he fooled many professors with his pseudo-psychological report in his appendices. Just be careful what you read and believe.

Larry- I read and was enchanted by Jon Krakeur's 'Into Thin Air' it's one of those books where you don't even have to have a passion for mountaineering to become absorbed into the writing.

-fish are quick

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2004 8:02 pm 
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:) fish are quick, I haven't read
any of the authors' books that you
mentioned, except David Eddings.
He also has written with his wife,
Leigh and I can recommend any of
the Sparhawk series, but first,
try The Conversion of Althalus.
It was really good and you don't
have to pick up any more in the
series.It was just the one novel.
But I think my fav is R.A.Salvatore
and his dark elf series. Rousing
reading and fascinating characters.

Suzanne


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2004 8:08 pm 
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Fish are quick: I believe that if you enjoyed Les Miserables you would find Tale of Two Cities equally good (though shorter so not quite as much suffering). I would suggest 'Two Cities' if you are on the fence about Dickens. His other, generally longer, works deal more with the plight of the mid nineteenth century lower classes. Interesting as period pieces but I don't feel as great a work as 'Cities'. This is only my view and many may feel otherwise.

Dickens wrote a good mix. For something a little lighter, but quite long, there is his Pickwick Papers. He also had a collection of Christmas/New years stories ( A Christmas Carol, The Chimes, A Cricket on the Hearth...) that were poinient and good holiday reading.

The Count of Monte Cristo is a masterpiece in the art of calculated revenge. The 'Count' seeks only justice and actually shows far more mercy than most would given the power he obtains over those who have wronged him without cause. I love his idea of having only three concerns: time, distance, and my own mortality. It makes me think of what Kipling wrote about 'fill the unforgiving minute with sixty seconds' worth of distance run'.

Now that I have reread 'Flies' I am anxious to see a film version. I think an interesting idea would be some follow-up on what transpired after the boys were rescued : did they all leave the island? Mightn't Jack and Peter choose to hide from the rescuers and try to keep a few others as their 'tribe'? What stories were told to explain their savage state and the 'missing' boys? I wonder what the author would say about the futures of these boys returning home to face questions about their actions. Any thoughts on this?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2004 11:07 am 
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First off, I am new here and would like to say hi to everyone. So hi!

Joseph: I too just finished 'Lord of the Flies.' I agree with your questions and I plan on seeing the film version sometime soon. It would be interesting to hear the boys explain the deaths of two of the characters, not to mention the fire one the island and why Ralph was wounded so. What would their outlook on life be post-island and how would they adjust to "correct" living again?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2004 5:30 pm 
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Callowayhorn: I think the backdrop of the story probably makes all the difference here. In most circumstances the boys would be brought under a lot of questioning and their actions thoroughly analyzed. Because this occurred during an atomic war , when all the 'grown ups' will have bigger fish to fry, it would most likely be swept under the carpet for the time being and dealt with much later.
All the boys who went back (and I believe Jack and Peter would rather not return to 'correct living') would have time to consolidate and rewrite their roles in the affair and most likely those who stayed behind would be blamed for everything; which works out well here since they were the worst of the lot anyway. This could give the others a chance to slip back into society but have plenty of nightmares and childhood tramas. Just my thoughts. What about :Lord of the Flies II: Return of the Tribes? Seems like a natural in the age of sequels.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2004 3:12 am 
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After giving up reading for a few months, I decided to pick it back up starting with Russian Lit. So right now I am reading The Master And Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, and Yevgeny Zamyatin's We (or will be as soon as it arrives). I am also thinking of reading Atlus Shrugged by Ayn Rand, but am still undecided at this point, and maybe a few short stories by Isaac Babel. Oh and if anyone knows where to find a copy of The Foundation Pit by Andrey Platinov I'd really like to know because every place I've checked says it's out of stock. So if anyone has any suggestions of other books or comments about these ones I'd like to hear them.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2004 10:55 pm 
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The only Russian literature I can remember reading was Crime and Punishment. Very odd story. Anyone know much about Anna Kareninna?
I have the book but haven't started it yet.


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 Post subject: Bücher!
PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 9:08 am 
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Right now I'm reading:
-Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
-The Hunger Artist by Franz Kafka
-1984 by George Orwell
:mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2004 9:13 am 
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Phaedrus wrote:
I read Catcher in the Rye. It's interesting to re-read classic books that you read in HS and go back to after you get older to gain new insights.



I LOVED Catcher in the Rye! :D

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2004 4:02 pm 
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unbearablelightness: 1984 = good. I loved this book. I read it a few months back for AP English. We also read Animal Farm. Orwell does well in both. Anti-utopian themes are interwoven throughout both works. Both are on my favourites list.


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