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 Post subject: Reading Nietzsche Again
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 9:45 am 
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Location: texas
What does not kill me, makes me stronger.

I have started reading Nietzsche again, as I enjoy the way he looked at the world, through the tragic sad eyes of his own humanity. Doubtless he wrestled with his own demons in trying to be the "overman", overcoming objections to this thoughts, aphorisms, and observations of life and culture. Sad to say that insanity played a part in the madness of Nietzsche, even sadder, his loneliness. But great men, become what they create...whether an "overman" or undesirable. They become what they become. :D


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 11:22 pm 
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I don't really understand that whole quote that you put on there. Can you please explain it to me?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2006 9:22 am 
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Nietzsche’s idea of an overman and life from his point of view
http://www.stanford.edu/~pj97/Nietzsche.htm
Quote:
Now it's obvious that there is a very great deal of similarity as between the concept of the Higher Evolution and the New Man on the one hand, and Nietzsche's conception of the Overman on the other. Not, of course, that the two are identical. As compared with the ideal, let us say, of Buddhahood, Nietzsche's overman is rather lacking in positive content, and this isn't surprising. After all, Nietzsche's conception of the overman is the product of thought, very brilliant thought, thought of a genius; but still thought, something intellectual, even though intellectual to the point of intuition, even though penetrating to the point of intuition, but still thought - not actual spiritual, not actual transcendental realisation. So for this reason, Nietzsche's conception of the overman is rather lacking in content, especially in positive content. But Nietzsche's main point is that the overman is not man as we know him, that the overman transcends man, goes far beyond man, goes beyond him as man himself transcends the ape. From this it is abundantly clear, starkly clear, we may say, that man is transitional. As we saw in Nietzsche's phrase, man is a rope stretched between the beast and the overman.
~ By Urgyen Sangharakshita.
© Centre Bouddhiste de l’Ile de France 2004.

http://www.centrebouddhisteparis.org/En_Anglais/Sangharakshita_en_anglais/Nietzsche_and_Superman/Higher_Evolution/higher_evolution.html


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 2:26 pm 
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I have heard it said that Nietzche was the first precurser to existentialism. Yet I have also heard that Dostoevsky was. I always thought it was Sarte who was the father of existentialism. Cold anyone help clarify this for me?


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